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BuzzFeed has breaking news, vital journalism, quizzes, videos, celeb news, Tasty food videos, recipes, DIY hacks, and all the trending buzz you’ll want to share with your friends. Copyright BuzzFeed, Inc. All rights reserved.

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    If you don’t know much outside the Premier League this probably isn’t the quiz for you.


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    A bit Over The Top if you ask me…

    Over The Top Golf

    Over The Top Golf

    The hole is accessible only by helicopter...

    The hole is accessible only by helicopter...

    youtube.com / Via Patrick Campbell / BuzzFeed


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    Eva Carneiro said the FA had “chosen to ignore” evidence in her sexism case.

    Former Chelsea club doctor Eva Carneiro has spoken out for the first time about her row with team manager Jose Mourinho over allegations he verbally abused her.

    Former Chelsea club doctor Eva Carneiro has spoken out for the first time about her row with team manager Jose Mourinho over allegations he verbally abused her.

    PA

    Carneiro, who left the club following the incident on the opening day of the season in August, confirmed that the Football Association had not interviewed her when investigating Mourinho's alleged remarks.

    The lack of support from the football authorities made life difficult for women in the game, she said.

    The Chelsea boss was accused by a member of the public of calling the doctor "filha da puta" (daughter of a whore) during the team's 2-2 draw with Swansea City on 8 August. Evidence to support the claim was provided by the organisation Women in Football.

    But the FA cleared Mourinho after consulting a Portuguese linguistics expert and deciding that the language he used was not discriminatory under its rules. Greg Dyke, the FA chairman, said Mourinho should have apologised to Carneiro.

    The ruling was sharply criticised by another FA board member, Heather Rabbatts, who said she had major concerns over the governing body's handling of the case.

    On Friday Carneiro, who was dropped from first team duties after the incident and has since quit the club, broke her silence, saying her evidence had been ignored.

    On Friday Carneiro, who was dropped from first team duties after the incident and has since quit the club, broke her silence, saying her evidence had been ignored.

    PA

    In a statement to Press Association Sport, she said:

    I was surprised to learn that the FA was allegedly investigating the incident of 8th of August via the press. I was at no stage requested by the FA to make a statement. I wonder whether this might be the only formal investigation in this country where the evidence of the individuals involved in the incident was not considered relevant. Choosing to ignore some of the evidence will surely influence the outcome of the findings.


    View Entire List ›


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    You belong with him!


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    And no, Arsene Wenger and Alex Ferguson are not included.


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    Jewel Samad / AFP / Getty Images

    NBA star Thabo Sefolosha was found not guilty Friday of three charges stemming from a April 8 confrontation with the New York Police Department in which officers broke his leg.

    Sefolosha looked relieved after the verdict was read and promptly left the courthouse. The jury deliberated for about 50 minutes.

    Outside, Sefolosha said he has not decided whether he will sue the city.

    When asked if he was surprised with the speed of the verdict, Sefolosha's lawyer, Alex Spiro, said, "no."

    Sefolosha, a Swiss-born guard-forward, plays for the Atlanta Hawks, who had just helped his team clinch a playoff berth days before his arrest. He missed the playoffs due to his broken leg and said Thursday that he hopes to be able to return to the court this season.

    In a Manhattan court this week a jury heard testimony from NYPD officers, Sefolosha’s coach and teammate, and the defendant himself.

    Sefolosha was charged with misdemeanor resisting arrest, obstructing government administration, and disorderly conduct. It was revealed this week that prosecutors offered a deal that would have dropped charges against the NBA player if he served one day of community service and stayed out of trouble for six months. Sefolosha and his attorney, Spiro, decided instead to move forward with the trial.

    According to Sefolosha’s testimony Wednesday, he was singled out of a crowd of people leaving a club and beaten by the NYPD without justifiable provocation.

    On Friday, after the verdict, he said his decision to testify was easy: "All I had to do was tell the truth."

    Earlier in the night, Sefolosha had been at a club called 1Oak with then-teammate Pero Antić. Outside the club that night, fellow NBA player Chris Copeland, who is not Sefolosha’s teammate, was stabbed. Sefolosha said he was not aware that Copeland had been stabbed when clubgoers were ordered to leave.

    Outside, NYPD began telling the crowd to disperse. Sefolosha said Thursday under cross-examination by Assistant District Attorney Francesca Bartolomey that he was instructed to go to his left, toward Tenth Avenue, and that he was told three times to move along the sidewalk.

    Sefolosha admitted Thursday that he called officer JohnPaul Giacona a "midget," but maintained that it was the only time he used derogatory language toward an officer.

    Upon reaching Tenth Avenue, Selofosha saw a car waiting and decided to take it back to his hotel. As he began to enter the car, a homeless man approached him and asked for money. Sefolosha said that when he extended his arm to hand money to the man, an officer grabbed him and told him to put his hands behind his back. Then, Sefolosha said, "seven or eight" officers began putting their hands on him, and while he was on his way to the ground, officer Giacona came up behind him and kicked him hard in the right leg. He said he told the officers to relax, and that he wasn't told he was under arrest. Still, he said he did not fight back, knowing he was outnumbered.

    During closing arguments Thursday, Sefolosha's attorney told the jury that NYPD saw Sefolosha as "just another black man in a hoodie."

    "They arrested him. They broke his leg out of eyeshot or earshot of an unrelated crime scene because he was giving a homeless person money," Spiro said. "You know what the public disturbance is? When they’re smashing him into the ground."

    The jury members quickly dispersed after the verdict was read and did not comment on their decision to acquit Sefolosha.

    NBA Players Association executive director Michele Roberts, who was in the courtroom for Sefolosha's cross-examination Thursday, tweeted excitedly about the decision:


    LINK: NYPD Internal Affairs Investigating Atlanta Hawks Player's Arrest And Injuries

    LINK: Hawks Player Injured For Season After Confrontation With NYPD Outside Manhattan Club


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    A hard slide from the Dodgers’ Chase Utley into Mets shortstop Ruben Tejada was ruled legal by MLB officials.

    A hard slide that changed the course of a playoff game between the Mets and Dodgers has been deemed controversial by fans, but legal under existing rules by MLB.

    A hard slide that changed the course of a playoff game between the Mets and Dodgers has been deemed controversial by fans, but legal under existing rules by MLB.

    MLB

    During the seventh inning of Game 2 of the National League Division Series between the New York Mets and the Los Angeles Dodgers, the Mets were up 2–1. With one out, Dodgers infielder Howie Kendrick hit a single that scored the runner from third base and advanced runner Chase Utley to second base. To get to the base, Utley did a late slide toward the base and sent Mets second baseman Ruben Tejada flying backwards into the air. Tejada was taken off the field with a cart.

    It was later announced that Tejada's leg was broken, ruling him out for the remainder of the postseason.

    Utley's slide proved to be immediately controversial: During the slide he at no point touched second base, but video replay showed that Tejada had missed touching the base by a couple inches, too. Though neither player had actually touched second base, Utley was ruled safe at second after a replay review.

    MLB implemented replay review only prior to the 2014 season, but has an exception for the "neighborhood play" — which is where an infielder will attempt to get an out at second and then throw to first, and is awarded the out even if he misses the base by a few inches.

    The allowance of the neighborhood play is in place specifically to prevent infielders from getting hurt.

    The play was reviewed, though, because MLB ruled that Tejada had no chance at turning a successful double play.

    An MLB official told Joel Sherman of the New York Post that an offensive player is favored in determining whether a runner is out or safe when neither the fielder nor the runner actually touch the base.

    After the play was settled, Tejada was replaced at shortstop by Wilmer Flores. Dodgers rookie Corey Seager hit a pop fly for the next out, then first baseman Adrian Gonzalez hit a double and advanced to third base to score Utley and Kendrick, bringing the score to 4–2. Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner hit another double next, scoring Gonzalez and bringing the score to 5–2, Dodgers.

    The Mets could not recover the lead, and the Dodgers took Game 2 of the NLDS. The Mets won Game 1, and the best-of-5 series will be tied when the teams return to the field in New York City on Monday night.

    The Dodgers will certainly take the field to a shower of boos from Mets fans, who have waited nine years for their team to appear in the MLB postseason.

    Though the play was technically legal by current MLB rules, Utley's slide remains controversial among baseball fans and analysts.

    Utley's slide was not ruled as interference on the field, and the call is not reviewable. However, rule 7.09 of MLB's official rules defines interference:

    If, in the judgment of the umpire, a batter-runner willfully and deliberately interferes with a batted ball or a fielder in the act of fielding a batted ball, with the obvious intent to break up a double play, the ball is dead; the umpire shall call the batter-runner out for interference and shall also call out the runner who had advanced closest to the home plate regardless where the double play might have been possible. In no event shall bases be run because of such interference.

    If Utley's slide had been called interference on the field, the double play would have ended the inning, and the Mets would have taken a one-run lead into the eighth inning.

    When asked postgame if Mets manager Terry Collins felt Utley's slide was clean, he responded simply: "Well, it broke my shortstop's leg."

    When asked to define a "dirty" slide, Utley told reporters he believes it is when a runner goes in "cleats high and hitting a guy before you hit the ground." He asserted that despite the outcome of the play, "there was no attempt to injure Ruben whatsoever."


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    Four public high schools in California still use the moniker.

    California governor Jerry Brown

    David Mcnew / Getty Images

    Public schools in California can no longer use "Redskins" as a team name or mascot, after Governor Jerry Brown signed a contested bill into law Sunday.

    Four public high schools in California currently use the name and mascot, and will have until 2017 to find a replacement. Assemblymember Luis Alejo, who authored the bill that passed through the Assembly 60-10, with ten abstaining, said in a news release that California is now the first state to pass a law specifically banning the term "Redskins" as a "school or athletic team name, mascot, or nickname."

    Oregon and Wisconsin have made moves as well to ban use of all Native American names and imagery by public schools. In Oregon, all the names will have to changed by 2017, per the State Board of Education. Wisconsin is debating a provision to allow individual schools to retain the name pending approval from local tribes.

    The new California law specifies only schools using "Redskins" will have to change the name. A similar bill was presented to then-Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger in 2004, who vetoed it because he believed it would "[divert] focus from increasing student academic achievement."

    To ease the financial burden on the four public schools that use the name – Gustine High School, Calaveras High School, Chowchilla Union High School, and Tulare High School – each can continue to use uniforms, school materials, and building fixtures that bear the "Redskins" mascot and name past January 1, 2017 until they must be replaced. But the first day of 2017 is the hard deadline for the schools to enact a new official mascot and nickname.

    California lawmakers have been pushing to strip the use of "Redskins" in public schools since at least 2002, with four failed bills leading up to Sunday's signing by Governor Brown. Assemblymembers representing Gustine and Tulare High Schools voted no on the bill from its introduction to passing, and an Assemblymember representing Chowchilla and Calaveras abstained from voting.

    The use of the name "Redskins" has become a prominent national discussion as the NFL team from Washington D.C. has dug in its heels about using the name despite growing opposition. Native American activists have long advocated against the name, which they have identified as a slur. Supporters of the name largely brush past the word's origins and meaning, and say their particular team uses it to "honor" the heritage of Native Americans.

    Molly Riley / Getty Images

    The responses — and claims of financial burden — by the four schools varied drastically. BuzzFeed News spoke with the Principals of Calaveras High School and Tulare Union High School in anticipation of the bill's signing.

    Michelle Nunley, Principal at Tulare Union, told BuzzFeed News her high school sent representatives to speak to the Senate Education Committee in Sacramento to voice their opposition to the bill. The state senate heard that leaders at TUHS had been in touch with tribes near Tulare to "make sure no one was offended." The bill passed the state senate Education Committee 6-1, with two abstaining. Nunley said the school has hosted members of the Tule River tribe to help educate their school on how to use the name in a way that honors the heritage of Native Americans.

    Tulare Union hasn't taken yet taken steps to ease the financial burden of a school-wide overhaul of the name and mascot, and Nunley told BuzzFeed News she expects the full cost of the overhaul will reach $750,000.

    Three hours north, in San Andreas, Calaveras High School principal Mike Merrill says his school has been preparing for what he says was an inevitable change, and that the mascot and name was phased out from uniforms already.

    "This is our fifth time through this, so there's no sense in creating hardship for our school. We're not a school that has the logo all over. We have been very strategic, not because we're not proud, but because we understand we don't need to have our logo all over to show our pride," he said. He estimates the only major expense for the school will be replacing the football scoreboard, which should run around $70,000.

    Merrill said he was invited to challenge the legislation at the Senate Education Committee, but "this is not something our district has chosen to fight as a battle. You can fight legislation, but you're not gonna win, so we've decided to put our resources behind things we know we have a shot at and continue our winning tradition."

    Calaveras High has worked with the local Miwok tribe, specifically tribal leader Gloria Grines, to be as tasteful as possible about using the name and mascot. When a new gym was built on campus, a headdress was painted on the floor, and Grines told administrators that feathers should never touch the floor. The floor was redone and a mural depicting a headdress was painted on a wall instead.

    Merrill admits that there is bound to be tension and frustration on both sides as the Calaveras community grapples with change. Still, the school board has already asked him to form a committee to choose a new name.

    Merrill says his handling of the impending name change has been informed by one large, national story.

    The Washington Redskins have resisted changing the name, despite legal, societal, and even weak legislative pressure. Team owner Dan Snyder has vowed never to change the name, but the team name was ruled in violation of United States trademark law on the basis that it "disparages" a people group. The decision was appealed by the Redskins, but they lost that appeal, too, and have appealed it yet again to a higher circuit.

    "Part of this is seeing what happened nationally as the Washington Redskins have been so inappropriate with how they handle things. It's made everything much more difficult for the rest of us, and we're not going to choose to go that route."


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    STAMFORD, CONNECTICUT — The first paid professional women’s hockey league in North America kicked off its inaugural season in Stamford, Connecticut Sunday afternoon.

    The New York Riveters faced the Connecticut Whale on the ice for the first time in a local community sports center in front of a sold-out crowd. The Riveters and Whale are two of four inaugural teams in the NWHL, along with the Boston Pride and Buffalo Beauts, who faced off in Buffalo a few hours after the puck dropped in Connecticut.

    Each of the NWHL’s four teams will host nine home games throughout the season, which will conclude following the playoffs in March 2016. The Pride and Riveters will each play exhibition games during the regular season, and all four teams will meet in Buffalo on January 24 for an All-Star game.

    Lindsey Adler/BuzzFeed News

    The National Women’s Hockey League, as it stands in its early stages, is a league run by women for women. On the ice prior to the Riveters–Whale game, local girls' hockey teams stood on the ice while and gave grazing high fives while the inaugural rosters were announced one by one. The National Anthem, was sung by Lisa Disimone the wife of an assistant coach for the Riveters, and the four referees patrolling the rink were, of course, women.

    The NWHL began its season with a fast-paced game in which the Connecticut Whale scored four goals over the New York Riveters’ one. Fans packed the small community center rink around the edges of the ice, faces jammed to the plexiglass and with signs in tow to support the return of professional hockey to Connecticut.

    The voices of young fans echoed through the small rink, which normally fits 500-700 spectators, but had 750 bodies crammed to watch the women on the ice today. Girls in the bleachers with their parents chanted “I believe that we will win,” the rally cry started during the 2014 FIFA World Cup, and continued through the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup.

    Twitter: @CTWhale_NWHL

    The Whale adopted its color scheme, team imagery, and name as an homage to the Hartford Whalers, Connecticut’s beloved NHL team that left the area for North Carolina and became the Carolina Hurricanes. When Whale forward Jessica Koizumi scored the first goal only 2:28 into the NWHL season, “Brass Bonanza,” the Whalers’ popular theme song played for the home team.

    Though the Riveters scored a tying goal early in the second period, the Whale matched with their own less than a minute of play later and went into the 3rd period with a 2–1 lead. Things fell apart for the Riveters late in the 3rd period, though, and the Whale were able to score two quick goals against goalie Nana Fujimoto, who also plays for Japan’s national women’s team.

    After the game, players from each team noted the the fast pace of play, which brought the level of the game up a notch from what they had played in the NCAA.

    "We were all NCAA players and we were the best in the NCAA,” said Whale forward Kelli Stack, who scored the second goal of the game. Stack who is also a member of the United States women’s national ice hockey team, is the highest paid in the league thus far, with a 2015-2016 salary of $25,000. Baseline salaries for the inaugural season start at $10,000, with the league schedule is built to accommodate players’ needs for other jobs at this time, with practices taking place only twice per week on evenings, and games played on Sundays.

    Player salaries are listed on NWHL’s official website, which NWHL Commissioner Dani Rylan explained matches the transparency of the NHL and other men’s professional leagues. For the players, Rylan said, publicly available salaries "gives them incentive to know what their teammates are making so they can work hard for the next year.”

    Bruce Bennett / Getty Images

    For the girls in the crowd, the formation of a paid women’s professional league gives them a goal beyond what the players themselves could have imagined at their age.

    “Seeing the little girls was awesome,” Stack said after the game. “It shows us that what we’re doing is inspiring the next generation. For a lot of us, that’s what we want to do with this league. We absolutely want to keep playing for ourselves, but also lay the foundation for all those girls who are 14, 15, 12 years old so they have somewhere to play and do what they love.”

    Stack grew up playing hockey with boys, and her hockey heroes were NHL stars. But for the many girls lined up around the rink and waiting after the game to get autographs from the Riveters and Whale, the NWHL has given them more role models to add to their rosters.

    “It’s really fun and exciting,” said 10-year-old Anastasia, who is a forward for a Connecticut girl’s hockey team. “It shows that girls can play whatever boys play, and that girls are strong too.”


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    Lace up those sneakers!

    When you know you need to go for a run, but just want to stay on your couch:

    instagram.com

    When every day is technically leg day, and this happens:

    instagram.com

    When you're trying to make a long run go by faster:

    instagram.com

    When your stomach is rumbling before a race, but you don't want to tempt fate:

    instagram.com


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    Utley will appeal, and be allowed to play until it is settled.

    Sean M. Haffey / Getty Images

    MLB has suspended Dodgers infielder Chase Utley for Games 3 and 4 of the National League Division Series against the Mets for a late slide into second base during Game 2 on Saturday night that left Mets shortstop Ruben Tejada with a broken leg.

    Utley will appeal, according to Fox Sports' Ken Rosenthal. He will be able to take the field until the appeal is settled.

    The Dodgers won Game 2 5–2 over the Mets, tying the best-of-5 series at 1–1. Utley was ruled safe on second base upon replay review, which was immediately noted to be a controversial interpretation of MLB rules.

    MLB Chief Baseball Officer Joe Torre said that "after thoroughly reviewing the play from all conceivable angles, I have concluded that Mr. Utley's action warrants discipline."

    "While I sincerely believe that Mr. Utley had no intention of injuring Ruben Tejada, and was attempting to help his Club in a critical situation, I believe his slide was in violation of Official Baseball Rule 5.09(a)(13), which is designed to protect fielders from precisely this type of rolling block that occurs away from the base.

    We have been in discussions with the Players Association throughout the year regarding potential rule changes to better protect middle infielders, and we intend to continue those discussions this offseason."

    Rule 5.09(a)(13) reads in full:

    [A batter is out when:] A preceding runner shall, in the umpire's judgment, intentionally interfere with a fielder who is attempting to catch a thrown ball or to throw a ball in an attempt to complete any play;

    The objective of this rule is to penalize the offensive team for deliberate, unwarranted, unsportsmanlike action by the runner in leaving the baseline for the obvious purpose of crashing the pivot man on a double play, rather than trying to reach the base. Obviously this is an umpire's judgment play.

    If the applicable rule had been applied correctly during Game 2, the Mets would have been awarded a double play, and the inning would have been over, with the Mets up 2–1. Because Utley was the runner on base — "preceding runner" — and interfered with Tejada's play at second base, MLB rule 5.09(a)(13) calls the batter out as well.

    The Mets quickly released a statement in support of the suspension, calling it "the appropriate course of action."

    On Twitter, the Dodgers responded to Utley's decision to appeal:

    "The Dodgers stand behind Chase Utley and his decision to appeal the suspension issued tonight by MLB. No further comment at this time."


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    They’re like a dog with a bone.

    With the unveiling of German manager Jurgen Klopp as their new boss last week, we have officially reached peak Liverpool.

    With the unveiling of German manager Jurgen Klopp as their new boss last week, we have officially reached peak Liverpool.

    Alex Livesey / Getty Images


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    This friendship will be a grand slam!


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    The Dodgers infielder was suspended two games Sunday for a late slide on Saturday night.

    Sean M. Haffey / Getty Images

    Dodgers infielder Chase Utley will be available to play Monday night against the Mets in Game 3 of the National League Division Series.

    Utley was suspended for two games Sunday for a late slide on Saturday that left Mets shortstop Ruben Tejada with a broken leg. Utley immediately appealed the suspension, but MLB moved to settle the appeal early Monday. The MLB Player's Union successfully argued that they would not have a fair shot to assemble an appeal case and said there was a lack of precedent. The appeal will now be held at a later date, giving Utley the chance to take the field.

    When Utley and the Dodgers take the field in Flushing, Queens, they are certainly in for a chorus of boos from furious Mets fans.

    On Saturday, Utley was ruled safe at second base upon replay review, a call that remains controversial but is technically compliant with MLB's own rules.

    Neither Utley nor Tejada actually touched the base while making the play, which many believed would give preference to Tejada based on the "neighborhood play," which allows infielders to be in the proximity of the base while turning a double play to avoid collisions and injury. However, MLB officials determined Tejada would not have been able to turn a double play as the Dodgers' Howie Kendrick ran to first, so the neighborhood play was not applicable. MLB's rules give preference to the baserunner over the infielder if neither touch the bag in this scenario.

    MLB

    On Sunday, Chief Baseball Officer Joe Torre announced a two-game suspension for Utley on the basis of a different part of the play: Interference. The rule Torre cited reads in full:

    [A batter is out when:] A preceding runner shall, in the umpire's judgment, intentionally interfere with a fielder who is attempting to catch a thrown ball or to throw a ball in an attempt to complete any play;

    The objective of this rule is to penalize the offensive team for deliberate, unwarranted, unsportsmanlike action by the runner in leaving the baseline for the obvious purpose of crashing the pivot man on a double play, rather than trying to reach the base. Obviously this is an umpire's judgment play.

    Had the interference been called correctly by field umpires — it is not a play reviewable by replay — the Mets would have been awarded a double play that would have ended the inning and sent them into the next inning up one run on the Dodgers.

    Instead, the Mets came undone during the seventh inning, and allowed the Dodgers to score four runs, taking Game 2 with a score of 5–2 and tying the series at 1–1.

    Fans and analysts pointed out Sunday night and Monday morning that Utley likely has a good case for his appeal because there is very little if any precedent for suspending a player for such a slide. In giving Utley the harsh suspension, Torre was certainly trying to send the message that MLB will take steps to protect middle infielders going forward, and it is very likely that rules will be modified this offseason to establish clear-cut procedure for situations like this in the future.

    Before Utley's final league sanction can be determined, though, he — or a teammate — is almost certain to face on-field retaliation from the Mets. Baseball players engage in a loose determination of "unwritten rules," which allow them to take justice into their own hands. Most commonly, retaliation is served by a pitcher intentionally hitting a batter, usually in the side or glutes.

    Of course, baseball's masculinity complex combined with the pressure needing to win playoff games could escalate or deflate the Mets' retaliation. With a conflict as intense as this one, pitchers are known to throw more dangerously at batters. If this happens on Monday night, it would likely escalate the situation, and could lead to more retaliation throughout the game or a bench-clearing brawl.

    However, escalation stands to hurt both the Mets and Dodgers tonight during Game 3, which will put the winning team only one win away from clinching the five-game series. First, the benches might be warned ahead of time that fighting or retaliation would lead to immediate ejection. For the Mets to take those chances with their starting pitcher during an important playoff game would be a form of shooting themselves in the foot. Even without a pre-game warning, if the situation escalates to a bench-clearing fight, it could lead to more injuries or more league sanctions.

    The Mets and Dodgers' managers, Terry Collins and Don Mattingly, will certainly consider the risk/reward of bringing this drama onto the field in Queens.

    On Monday afternoon, it was announced that Utley was not in the Dodgers' starting lineup.

    According Anthony DiComo of MLB.com, Mets manager Terry Collins specifically instructed starting pitcher Matt Harvey "not to throw at anyone."

    "We cannot let our emotions take over here. We've got to let the past go," Collins told DiComo. "We can't just give a game away to show Ruben were backing him up. If Harvey gets ejected in the second inning, we're in trouble. The minute we make this some kind of grudge match, we're going to make some mistakes."


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    Play ball!


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    The superstar striker was close to making a transfer move to the UK when his plans were scuppered.

    Robert Lewandowski's career has been stellar to say the least.

    Robert Lewandowski's career has been stellar to say the least.

    The 27-year-old is in the form of his life, smashing in goals for Poland (helping them to Euro 2016 qualification in France) and for his club side, Bayern Munich.

    Adam Nurkiewicz / Getty Images

    At the moment it seems like he's breaking records every week.

    View Video ›

    As well as the multiple records detailed above, he has scored a record tally of 13 goals in Poland's Euro 2016 qualification group, and scored 100 Bundesliga goals quicker than any other foreign player.

    Facebook: BuzzFeedFootball

    BUT it could have all been so, so different. In 2010, Lewandowski was close to agreeing terms with an English club, and was set to fly to the UK to put pen to paper, but had his flight cancelled due to the Icelandic ash cloud.

    BUT it could have all been so, so different. In 2010, Lewandowski was close to agreeing terms with an English club, and was set to fly to the UK to put pen to paper, but had his flight cancelled due to the Icelandic ash cloud.

    *Waves fist in anger at Iceland ash cloud*

    Barcroft Media / Getty Images


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    A portrait of Adam Goodes performing an Aboriginal war dance is a powerful end to a stellar career.

    Adam Goodes has taken a parting shot at his critics by selecting the moment he performed an Aboriginal war dance as his official retirement portrait from AFL.

    Adam Goodes has taken a parting shot at his critics by selecting the moment he performed an Aboriginal war dance as his official retirement portrait from AFL.

    The oil portrait called 'The Dance' was painted by Jamie Cooper who told Fairfax Media that Goodes was adamant that the war dance, which he performed during the Indigenous Round earlier this year, should be preserved for posterity.

    "He had a pretty good idea that when it all dies down, in the years to come, that image will be remembered, for all the right reasons," Cooper said.

    "He said that was a really defining moment for him. He was really committed all the way through."

    'The Dance' by Jamie Cooper.

    Goodes performed the war dance in May after scoring a goal against Carlton. It sparked heated debate between high profile non-indigenous commentators who thought the display was aggressive.

    Goodes performed the war dance in May after scoring a goal against Carlton. It sparked heated debate between high profile non-indigenous commentators who thought the display was aggressive.

    Goodes had been the subject of racial taunts and continuous booing since 2013 when he was called an ape by a 13-year-old spectator.

    In July, Goodes was subjected to so much booing throughout a game with the West Coast Eagles that Aboriginal teammate Lewis Jetta did a war dance toward the crowd. Two West Coast supporters were evicted from the grounds, one of them yelling that Goodes should, "go back to the zoo."

    Following the incident, Goodes, a dual Brownlow Medallist took time off, returning for two games before retiring last weekend.

    Goodes stepped away from the game and declined to do a lap of honour and refusing to give interviews.

    Goodes played 372 games, the eighth highest of any player and the most games for an Indigenous player.

    Sydney Swans

    Sydney Swans


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    Thorpie might not love to rap, but he sure can freestyle.

    Ian Thorpe is 33 today, and we think that deserves some celebrating.

    Ian Thorpe is 33 today, and we think that deserves some celebrating.

    Here's Ian, a true-blue Aussie icon, handsome AF, standing in front of some bridge, I guess.

    Matt King / Getty Images

    Chris Mcgrath / Getty Images

    Getty Images


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    Tom Bosworth, a British hope for success at the Rio 2016 Olympics, came out on the Victoria Derbyshire show on BBC Two.

    Tom Bosworth, Britain's No 1 racewalker, is a Rio 2016 hopeful and the holder of three British records in the sport.

    Tom Bosworth, Britain's No 1 racewalker, is a Rio 2016 hopeful and the holder of three British records in the sport.

    Ben Hoskins / Getty Images

    Bosworth said he made the decision to come out publicly in the hope it would make it easier for other athletes in his position.

    Bosworth said he made the decision to come out publicly in the hope it would make it easier for other athletes in his position.

    "To speak out about this, being a sportsman, it's still news unfortunately.

    "In a few years' time I can really see this just being anybody else, anybody can succeed in sport, and if more people can come out, then that will be evident.

    "It's a scary thing. I'm really lucky, I've got a loving partner, a great family behind me, everyone is really supportive and welcoming. I've got no problem at all.

    "That's not the same with everyone else though, unfortunately, in this sport.

    "In sport, I don't think being gay is still a normal thing.

    "I can't tell you why, I don't have an answer for that. In most other things now it's very normal to have a gay colleague, teachers, anything, any line of work it's common to be open. In sport it's not."

    J Kruger - British Athletics

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    Glorious footballing moment, or one statue’s desperate cry for help?

    Brazilian football legend Pelé landed in Kolkata on Sunday, visiting the city after 38 years. Needless to say, he received a tremendous welcome.

    Brazilian football legend Pelé landed in Kolkata on Sunday, visiting the city after 38 years. Needless to say, he received a tremendous welcome.

    Dibyangshu Sarkar / AFP / Getty Images

    A statue was unveiled in honour of Pelé's achievements, which was based on this image of the footballer's iconic bicycle kick.

    A statue was unveiled in honour of Pelé's achievements, which was based on this image of the footballer's iconic bicycle kick.

    Mary Turner / Getty Images for Halcyon Gallery

    There's something off about the statue though.

    There's something off about the statue though.

    Hindustan Times / Via Twitter: @htTweets


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