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BuzzFeed has breaking news, vital journalism, quizzes, videos, celeb news, Tasty food videos, recipes, DIY hacks, and all the trending buzz you’ll want to share with your friends. Copyright BuzzFeed, Inc. All rights reserved.

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    Brace yourself. It’s football season.

    BuzzFeed Video / Via youtu.be


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    The Queen of Tennis recently debuted her HSN line on the New York Fashion Week runway.

    We caught up with Serena Williams before her Serena Williams Signature Statement Collection NYFW show, and asked what her advice is for young girls who want to do it all. Naturally, she had some brilliant advice.

    "You can do anything! You know it's all about time management. You can manage your time well and you can be who you want and you can do anything. You know if I can do it — I'm no more special than anyone else, and that means they can do it too!"

    instagram.com

    Serena's friends were in full support and sitting front row, while her ~alleged~ boo, Drake, even made the infamous Anna Wintour SMILE!

    I guess Anna approves of the blossoming relationship?

    instagram.com

    Drake found Serena backstage after the show and gave us this absolutely ADORABLE moment.

    instagram.com

    Just a week after playing in the U.S. Open, Serena put together a flawless show with intricate details stemming from the director-like seats..

    instagram.com


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    No word on if white smoke will accompany every pitching change.

    The Philadelphia Phillies will give away Pope Francis rookie cards during their game against the Washington Nationals Thursday. The Pope will visit the City of Brotherly Love on September 27.

    The Philadelphia Phillies will give away Pope Francis rookie cards during their game against the Washington Nationals Thursday. The Pope will visit the City of Brotherly Love on September 27.

    Courtesy of the Phillies

    The Pope, who will instantly become at least the third most recognizable member of the Phillies roster, was assigned #266.

    The Pope, who will instantly become at least the third most recognizable member of the Phillies roster, was assigned #266.

    Courtesy of the Phillies

    Pope Francis will host Mass to celebrate the World Meeting of Families 2015 at 4 p.m. on Sunday the 27th. Earlier that day, the Phillies will face the Washington Nationals at home.

    Pope Francis will host Mass to celebrate the World Meeting of Families 2015 at 4 p.m. on Sunday the 27th. Earlier that day, the Phillies will face the Washington Nationals at home.

    Pope Francis on September 2.

    Vincenzo Pinto / AFP / Getty Images


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    Only one security guard was able to intervene when a Vikings fan was kicked and punched by multiple 49ers fans on Monday.

    Jeff Gross / Getty Images

    A video of multiple San Francisco 49ers fans assaulting a Minnesota Vikings fan on the ground outside the 49ers' Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, California, on Monday night went viral this week after a 49ers fan posted it to his Facebook account.

    In the video, 49ers fans are seen kicking and punching a defenseless man in a Vikings jersey as the crowd around them screams at them to stop.

    The primary agitator is a man in a Jerry Rice jersey who follows the Vikings fan as he tries to crawl away from the attack. Another man wearing a Patrick Willis jersey and a small woman in a NaVorro Bowman jersey also follow and attack the man as he tries to get away.

    "The 49ers won! What the hell is wrong with you guys?" a man off-camera can be heard yelling at the people kicking and punching the Vikings fan.

    A lone security guard, an employee of Landmark Event Staffing, is seen defusing the situation and manages to hold off the 49ers fans long enough for the Vikings fan to get away.

    Warning: Graphic video.

    youtube.com

    In a statement released Tuesday, the 49ers called the incident "disturbing."

    "The 49ers and our public safety partners have a steadfast commitment to ensuring a safe and enjoyable experience for all visitors to Levi's Stadium and unacceptable behavior such as this will not be tolerated," the team said.

    On Wednesday, the 49ers added they found it "sad that the actions of a few can negatively affect the reputation of a great fan base."

    The victim, a 35-year-old father of two whose wife is a 49ers fan, sustained a concussion and bruises on his head from the attack, BuzzFeed News learned Tuesday.

    A spokesman for the Santa Clara Police Department said they were investigating the situation, but that no arrests had been made. Investigators are in contact with the victim, police said.

    The 49ers said they were "collaborating" with the SCPD in the investigation.

    The video of the attack was posted on Facebook by 23-year-old Brandon Cosio, who told BuzzFeed News he wasn't aware his post setting were set to public when he uploaded the video Monday night.

    After the video went viral, Cosio said four police officers and two Santa Clara detectives show up at his home.

    "I thought I was just sharing a video with friends of mine. Never in a million years would I have thought that it would get 1.6 million views within 12 hours," he said.

    "If I had known that I would he never posted it and just gave it to the police immediately," he said.

    Cosio later deleted the video.

    In a caption on the video post, Cosio explained what he saw leading up to the brawl:

    The Viking fan in the video and a 49er fan NOT in the video were talking smack to each other, getting into each others [sic] faces. A lot of fans from both sides were telling both people to stop and just walk to their cars. The 49er fan then walked away from the situation and that's when the Viking fan may have got a little cocky. The Viking fan turned around and addressed everyone behind him (mostly 49er fans). He said " what's up, any of you fuckers want some?!" At that point everyone went silent for 2 seconds then as the Viking fan was turning around to walk away, the 49er fan in the black (at the beginning of the video who threw the first punch) tackled him to the ground. That's where the video starts.

    Cosio would not comment further on the brawl, but commended the Landmark Security guard for breaking up the situation, suggesting that he even saved the Vikings fan's life.

    "If he wasn't there, things could have gotten a lot worse," Cosio said. "There were zero police officers in the area, from the beginning of the fight until the end. Zero showed up."

    Cosio said he told detectives that he had never seen police patrolling the stadium parking lots after games, except to direct traffic.

    The SCPD and the 49ers each declined to provide numbers of security guards or police assigned to each game at Levi's Stadium, citing safety and privacy concerns. However, the team's struggles with properly staffing and allocating security around the stadium has been well documented since its opening in 2014.

    Mike Rosenberg, a former San Jose Mercury News reporter who covered the stadium development for four years and is now based in Seattle, reported in 2013 that the City of Santa Clara was seeking 120 police officers to work stadium duty for $55 per hour in addition to in-house SCPD officers.

    Separate from the game-day police officers for hire, 49ers contractor Landmark Event Staffing keeps a continual list of ads on Craigslist seeking security and other fan services positions. Rosenberg reported in August 2014, four days before the first 49ers game was played at the stadium, that Landmark was posting ads that offered to pay $290 certification costs for prospective security guards.

    Levi's Stadium and the 49ers have also struggled to make parking at or around the stadium easy for fans attending games. The 49ers did not host a Monday night or Thursday night game during their inaugural season at Levi's due to a parking shortage, partially because lots are in use by employees of nearby businesses on weekdays.

    The team managed to add parking between this season and last, but the parking situation has required a considerable amount of game-day event staffers to help manage the traffic in and out of the stadium.

    "I think the assumption was the 'wine and cheese crowd' that came with high ticket prices would make going to games safer than Candlestick," Rosenberg told BuzzFeed News Wednesday. "But there are always going to be drunk and violent fans looking to cause trouble."


    View Entire List ›


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    Subie Doo, we love you.


    View Entire List ›


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    Ricky Williams was walking across the University of Texas at Austin campus at the end of the fall 2014 semester, headed to take his American Government final exam. With him were two classmates — current student-athletes — who nervously discussed their grades in the course. One student said he hoped for a C, then asked Williams what grade he carried in the class. Williams said he had a high A, a 95%. The student-athletes hurried their pace and left Williams trailing behind.

    “Whoops, I probably should have kept that to myself,” Williams recently said over a cup of green tea at a café adjacent to the campus, twisting his face as if he were embarrassed, then laughing.

    Twenty years ago, Williams was just like the young men who left him in the dust that day. He first enrolled at the University of Texas in 1995, and then played four seasons of record-breaking — and Heisman-winning — football as a running back. Through the first two years, his C-level grades reflected the academic ambitions of his successors on the field. His only A in his first three semesters came in an Introduction to Psychology class.

    Williams is now back in school at the University of Texas and is within a year of finishing his long-suspended bachelor’s degree. Soon to begin his third semester, Williams is working toward a degree in Physical Culture and Sports, a program that allows him to study the philosophy, history, and, most notably, the psychology of athletics. After graduation, he intends to apply to graduate programs with the hope of earning a Ph.D. in psychology.

    Most people know Williams from his 11 tumultuous years as a running back in the NFL, but his public discussion of his social anxiety and marijuana use while he was a league star has often hung over him like a cloud. When Williams was on the field, he showed a glimmer of becoming the greatest, a thrill that undoubtedly embittered fans who watched as he dropped out, and in, and out of the league. Now, as Williams orients himself within the world of academia, he is adjusting to another difficult-to-navigate new territory: consistency.

    In Williams’ 38 years, turmoil has been one of few constants. From a fractured family environment as a child to his back-and-forths with the NFL, his experiences have instilled in him an intimate knowledge of chaos. But Ricky Williams is no longer the limitless young man he was at the peak of his fame: He is a father, a husband, a man who lives comfortably in a nice home in suburban Austin. He could be a generic American man. But though the tumult has mostly settled, there’s still a frenetic vibration that remains. It makes Williams handle his new challenges in a way that is, as always, uniquely Ricky.

    “I find my biggest challenge is getting people to let go of me as a football player and be willing to consider me as that and something else,” Williams said during an interview on UT’s campus in June. “But for most people, being a professional football player is like the pinnacle of their imagined life or actual life. For me, as much as I tried to make it that, it just hasn't worked. I still want more.”

    As a kid, Williams dreamed of playing professional baseball — he grew up loving the fast feet of Rickey Henderson and the 1980s Oakland Athletics — or becoming a teacher. But like so many of this generation’s top athletes, Williams saw football as “his way out” of a tumultuous childhood. After his four seasons at UT, he answered when the NFL came knocking. “If I were being true to myself,” he says now, “I probably wouldn’t have gone into the NFL. Sometimes I feel like I wasted at least five years of my life playing football. It wasn’t really what I wanted to be.”

    The University of Texas athletic museum.

    credit tk

    Williams grew up quickly, living in a broken home in San Diego with his twin sister Cassandra and younger sister Nisey; he’s still close with both of them. His parents, Sandy and Errick — Williams is Errick Jr., legally — divorced when he was six, and less than a year later, Errick Sr. was convicted of “annoying or molesting children” — his own twins. Sandy, suddenly raising three kids by herself, was rarely able to make it to things like Little League games, and Williams quickly sharpened his independence. By the age of 5, he was doing laundry and making dinner for his sisters, and though his intelligence was never a question — “That’s what I had on my sisters! I was always the smart one” — he floundered in classes, posting inferior grades until he reached high school.

    Before committing to the University of Texas, he was interested in moving a few hours north of San Diego, his hometown, to attend Stanford, where legendary NFL coach Bill Walsh was coaching after leaving the 49ers. Walsh retired in the middle of the recruiting season, Williams remembers vividly. “If not, I would have been a Cardinal for sure.”

    Williams became a Longhorn in 1995. During his four football seasons at the University of Texas, he racked up a record-breaking 6,279 career rushing yards.

    Williams meets with academic advisor Kevin Cokley in June 2015.

    Drew Anthony Smith for BuzzFeed News

    In November 1998, Williams’ fourth year with the team, he broke Tony Dorsett’s NCAA Division I career rushing record of 6,082 yards against Texas A&M. He’d entered the game 62 yards shy of the record and said he knew it was not a matter of if, but how he’d break it during the rivalry game. With 1:45 left in the first quarter, Williams broke past the defensive line with hardly any resistance and hit the open field, sprinting 60 yards into the end zone. Williams ran for 259 total yards that day, and the Longhorns won 26–24 — the record was his, and later that season, the Heisman Trophy, college football’s top honor, would be too.

    Williams and his daughter Asha at home in Texas.

    Drew Anthony Smith for BuzzFeed News

    When Williams entered the 1999 NFL Draft, he was poised — and expected — to be the NFL’s most exciting rookie. The New Orleans Saints, who drafted him fifth overall, could not resist the explosive running back’s potential, and coach Mike Ditka traded away the rest of the team’s picks that season and two for the next season to nab him. It was a lot of pressure, and Williams could not carry the team by himself. He was traded to the Miami Dolphins before the 2002 season.

    Williams says he felt like he “was being strangled” during NFL work days, so he’d “hurry to get back home where I could relax and be myself.” Many nights, that consisted of getting high and writing in a journal, reading, or playing guitar. Marijuana was the Band-Aid to quiet his underlying dissatisfaction. But when Williams began failing league-sanctioned drug tests over and over again, he was lambasted by fans, media, and the NFL.

    Williams retired abruptly, just before the 2004 season. It would have been his third with the Dolphins. He’d tested positive for marijuana three times, and in the face of a suspension, he fled the league. He booked a one-way ticket to Australia, where he lived in a tent and hid from the football career he wasn’t certain he wanted. But the Dolphins had paid Williams a signing bonus that was supposed to cover his career, and he owed them $8 million he didn’t have. After a lawsuit, and the hiring of Nick Saban as head coach, Williams reconsidered his choices. “I thought to myself: If I don't go back to football...the way I left, my life is gonna be much more complicated,” he said. “If I can go back and heal my reputation, my life is gonna be much easier. I saw perspective, I saw how football could help me.”

    He returned, his debt was forgiven, and after a four-game suspension he ran a subpar season for Miami.

    But the year off didn’t change much. He failed a fourth drug test in 2005 and was suspended by the NFL for the entire 2006 season. Instead of heading back to his tent, Williams joined the Canadian Football League. He appeared in 11 games with the Toronto Argonauts but suffered a broken arm, and during the recovery his Achilles tendon was nearly severed when a heavy door closed on his leg. He returned to the Dolphins after the 2006 season, drawing the the ire of the CFL, who’d been loaned a superstar only to see him yanked back. (Suspended NFL players are no longer allowed to defect to the CFL, under a bylaw known colloquially as the “Ricky Williams Rule.”)

    Williams finished out his NFL career quietly. He ran four more seasons in Miami, and after a one-year stint with the Baltimore Ravens, he retired — for good — after the 2011 season. He rushed for 10,009 yards during his 11 years in the league. Only six other retired players accrued more rushing yards in the same or fewer games. But Williams took something, for him, even greater away from this time weaving in and out of the NFL: time for reflection during his suspensions and experimentation with natural healing while in Canada. Both opened his mind to new adventures away from football.

    Williams with his family.

    Drew Anthony Smith for BuzzFeed News

    During Williams’ first stint at the University of Texas, his on-field performance was far more illustrious than his academics. He carried mostly C’s and D’s — with A’s in weight training and a psychology course. In the semesters leading up to his departure from UT and entrance into the NFL, he recorded consecutive semesters with straight F’s.

    But when he moved to Miami to play for the Dolphins, he began attending classes at Nova Southeastern University, which, conveniently, is also home to the Dolphins practice facility. As his stability in the NFL began its quick downward spiral, Williams pulled straight A’s.

    During his year abroad in Canada, Williams turned to osteopathy while recovering from his broken arm. It’s an alternative form of healing focused on massage and stretching. Osteopaths are licensed health care professionals, and though many patients swear by it, the effectiveness of osteopathy is not proven.

    The experience of osteopathy in Canada changed Williams’ perspective on bodies and how they heal. “I was like, wow, something was very different. My headaches went away. My blurry vision went away. So I realized throughout this could be really helpful for athletes and decided to get really interested in that.”

    Upon returning to Miami, Williams completed a massage therapy program and received his license so he could practice craniosacral therapy, a brain-centric form of osteopathy that is supported by only weak scientific evidence. Williams trained with healer Hugh Milne, a third-generation osteopath who runs a craniosacral institute in Big Sur, California. Williams will take his University of Texas classes online next semester so he can travel to Tuscany to practice with Milne.

    Williams’ enthusiasm for alternative healing is a corollary to his pursuit of a psychology Ph.D. His pursuit of psychology and brain-related healing bears the impact of his physically and emotionally demanding career. In 2012, Williams appeared on longtime friend Dan Le Batard’s ESPN show to share his perspective on football-related brain trauma.

    Williams on Nov. 27, 1998, shortly before the game against Texas A&M in which he broke the career rushing record.

    Eric Gay / ASSOCIATED PRESS

    “Yes, I'm aware that football is a rough sport,” Williams said, “but instead of saying, 'Oh, I'm doomed to brain trauma,' I said, 'What can I do about it?' And I just started taking care of my body. I found people, places, and things that really helped me. Again, I don't know what's going to happen to me in 10 years, but I look at the other things I've learned about, and the way I see the world."

    Williams continues to hope football players — current and former — will give craniosacral therapy a shot. As for his own cognitive health, Williams doesn’t believe he’s old enough to begin feeling any effects of repetitive hard hits to the head. “If I do start having complications, I’m up for it,” he said one day between classes.

    “I love change and transformation, and ultimately, I think healing is transformation and change. So if it shows up, I’ll get to work and see what I can transform.”

    Williams asks as many questions as he is asked, and he answers with long, wandering trains of thought. He is earnest and seemingly incapable of posturing. He was the sensitive, thinking man’s athlete in a league that cherishes platitudes about grit and hard-nosed perseverance. Physically, it was as if he was built in the image of the NFL’s ideal. Emotionally, he could never seem to become that athlete who spoke in expertly formed sound bites. Williams often did interviews with his helmet on, a physical shield that hardly served to protect him from the constant media intrusion.

    “What inspires me to pursue a doctoral degree is simple: helping people," Williams wrote in a sample application essay for a Ph.D. program. "I aim to reach my greatest potential and share what I have learned with others around me in an effort to facilitate their success. My desire to help others, who like me, have innate strengths and talents waiting to be discovered, informs my academic and research interests and goals.”

    Academia is like football in that it allows daily practice and learning within a narrow scope, Williams says. It’s the process of research that appeals most deeply to him now, and the never-ending work is an outlet that, in the past, has proved unwieldy for Williams. Test-taking, dreaded by most students, gives Williams a chance for flair, for showing the quantifiable result of hard-earned ability. “It reminds me of the weekly football game,” he said. “You practice all week, then you’ve got to show what you’ve got.”

    In class, Williams is anything but the quiet, shielded presence he was on the field. His curiosity is boundless, his love for knowledge uncontainable. Since returning to UT, he’s earned “nine A’s and two A-’s,” he notes, making the distinction clear.

    “Ricky was definitely one of those guys,” said professor Tolga Ozyurtcu, who had Williams in a Philosophy of Sport class in spring 2014. “Like, oh man, we’ve got a minute left of class and you’re going to ask that question right now? He got some eyerolls from the back of the class.”

    “If the goal of a Ph.D.’s work is to fill in knowledge we don’t have, he has that mentality,” he continued. “He’s looking for answers and asking good questions.”

    In a child psychology class on a late June afternoon, Williams sheepishly asked to borrow some paper from me. He forgot his notebook that day, and he prefers to take notes by hand. “If I’m doing something active, like writing physical notes, I feel like I’m learning. It’s an athlete thing, I think.”

    At the end of class, Williams tucked his four sheets of notes into his backpack and headed home to study for the next day’s exam. “I didn't realize it until I came back how much I enjoyed school and how important it is for me to do well,” he said. “I just think if I would have taken school more seriously when I was here the first time, my whole NFL career would have been so different.”

    Williams with his Heisman Trophy in 1998.

    Suzanne Plunkett / AP

    These days, Williams goes totally unnoticed walking around the campus where he is honored with a larger-than-life statue at the corner of the Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium — even wearing his Longhorns hat and Longhorn-orange sneakers.

    But in class, when younger students want to figure out who the older person asking endless questions is, they recognize Williams. Before a GRE prep course one June afternoon, he asked a small group of students if they knew who he was.

    “I played as you in NFL Blitz, man!” exclaimed Terrell, one of the students.

    Williams, sipping a kombucha and scrolling through a practice GRE test on his MacBook Air, seems genuinely surprised by this. The 15 or more years' difference between Williams and his classmates tempers his "celebrity on campus" status — and he doesn’t mind that.

    Drew Anthony Smith for BuzzFeed News


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    “After I saw the recent images on the news, I felt I had to do something to help the millions of children and their families who have been forced to flee their homes.”

    Andy Murray has announced he will donate £50 to the children’s charity Unicef for every ace he hits from now until the end of the year.

    Andy Murray has announced he will donate £50 to the children’s charity Unicef for every ace he hits from now until the end of the year.

    Alex Goodlett / Getty Images

    Every ace the world No 3 hits will support Unicef's work with children fleeing conflict and disaster, including those caught up in the refugee crisis, the charity said.

    "After I saw the recent images on the news, I felt I had to do something to help the millions of children and their families who have been forced to flee their homes," Murray said.

    "I'll get that little bit more satisfaction from each ace I hit knowing that it will be helping Unicef keep children safe."

    Tennis governing bodies the ATP and the LTA, and one of Murray’s sponsors, Standard Life, have said they will match the 28-year-old’s pledge – meaning each ace will actually be worth £200.

    Tennis governing bodies the ATP and the LTA, and one of Murray’s sponsors, Standard Life, have said they will match the 28-year-old’s pledge – meaning each ace will actually be worth £200.

    Jordan Mansfield / Getty Images

    The British star has urged tennis fans around the world to support Unicef's work and asked them to donate through his JustGiving page.

    The page currently has a target of £15,000.

    Unicef UK executive director David Bull said: "The conflict in Syria continues to have a devastating impact on the lives of children, both in the region and beyond. The fear, the lack of opportunity and loss of hope has forced thousands of families to make the dangerous journey to Europe.

    "The support of Andy and his fans, and the wider tennis community, can help us continue to provide support for children whenever and however disaster strikes."


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    For Thursday nights are dark and full of terrors.


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    The Rugby World Cup is upon us – but do you know the intricacies of the rules?

    Thinkstock / BuzzFeed


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    Do you need a touch judge?

    So that you can discover Chris Robshaw's openside.

    So that you can discover Chris Robshaw's openside.

    David Rogers / Getty Images

    And see Mike Phillips go up and under.

    And see Mike Phillips go up and under.

    Stu Forster - World Rugby / Getty Images

    Then you can tell Kane Thompson to get in your sin bin.

    Then you can tell Kane Thompson to get in your sin bin.

    Mike Hewitt - World Rugby / Getty Images

    And get taken into touch by George North.

    And get taken into touch by George North.

    Stu Forster - World Rugby / Getty Images


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    “I have been staring at this man’s bum for 20 minutes now.”

    Thinkstock / BuzzFeed

    1. What a gorgeous day for a swim!

    2. Jfc, it's cold.

    3. One mile in a 50-metre pool is 32 lengths, which is just 16 back-and-forths, which is only a little bit more than 10, and that's really not very far.

    4. My body kinda hurts already though.

    5. And I've only done two lengths.

    6. OK, front crawl is not a sustainable stroke.

    7. If I keep doing front crawl, my legs will fall off, I will have nothing to kick with, and then I will drown.

    8. I must not drown.

    9. Isn't it weird that swimmers literally put themselves into a situation where they have to keep exercising to stay alive?

    10. For fun.

    11. There are no other sports like that.

    12. Running would be, if you were being chased by a murderer.

    13. But then you'd have to employ a murderer to run behind you.

    14. Damn, I've lost count.

    15. Have I done three lengths or four?

    16. Hang on, I can work this out. I started from the shallow end on one, which is an odd number, and I'm now swimming towards the shallow end, so I must be on an even number.

    17. I must be on four.

    18. I should be timing myself.

    19. I wonder how long swimming a mile takes.

    20. Probably like half an hour.

    21. 5 – 5 – 5 – 5.

    22. 5 – 5 – staying alive.

    23. That's a funny rhyme.

    24. It would be weird if someone knew I wrote that lil' rhyme just now.

    25. OK, this is a good system. I swim to the deep end doing front crawl, and back to the shallow end swimming breaststroke.

    26. That way, I can get my breath back every other stroke.

    27. Except my face is under water, so I can't really.

    28. I need to overtake this guy.

    29. Why is he speeding up?

    30. I can't just slip back in behind him now I've started overtaking him, can I?

    31. Well, that's the fastest I've ever swum – thank god I can do breaststroke back.

    32. Oh Christ, he's overtaking me.

    33. This is embarrassing.

    34. Oh god, I stroked his leg. He probably thinks I'm coming on to him.

    35. Now I'm staring at his bum.

    36. I've done 11. Legs 11, like in bingo. Except with two kicking legs that are getting more and more toned the more I swim.

    37. I wonder if my arms will get too muscly though?

    38. I don't want to look like a bodybuilder.

    39. Hang on, people work hard to become bodybuilders. You can't accidentally become one. I'm probably safe.

    40. Maybe I should venture into the fast lane?

    41. No way, I'm scared of the fast lane.

    42. There's a woman in a wetsuit in it.

    43. I'm not serious enough to own a wetsuit.

    44. How do people dry wetsuits? I feel like they must always smell.

    45. Hey, I'm at 16. I'm halfway through.

    46. Tbh, I could just stop now.

    47. "I swam half a mile this morning" still sounds impressive.

    48. I'd be lying to myself though.

    49. And that's the worst person you can lie to.

    50. At least I'm not in the slow lane.

    51. Is that woman walking? In a pool? She probably has an injury, I shouldn't judge.

    52. It looks fun. I wanna walk.

    53. Whoa, the lady who just overtook me has a float between her legs.

    54. Which means that just her arms are faster than my arms and legs put together.

    55. That's crazy.

    56. Ahhhh, I'm wearing contact lenses.

    57. It's probably fine, hardly any water gets inside goggles; that's literally their purpose.

    58. Except they are leaking, and it stings.

    59. I wonder if I should attempt one of those somersault-and-kick-off-the-side moves when I get to the end of this length?

    60. I'd hit someone in the face, wouldn't I?

    61. Also, it's nice to have a little breather at the end of a length.

    62. 20 lengths! I'm basically done.

    63. For every 20, I will think of a person I know who is that age for the whole length.

    64. My sister is 21. I must call her later.

    65. OK, I don't know any 22-year-olds.

    66. There's that Taylor Swift song though.

    67. I don't know any 23-year-olds either. This is the worst method.

    68. I AM 24! THIS IS MY LENGTH!

    69. What's the time?

    70. Jesus, it's been half an hour. Miles take ages.

    71. I wonder how many miles the Channel is.

    72. If I swam the Channel I would look like a prune.

    73. Twenty-six! My boyfriend is 26!

    74. Wait, stop. Leave my head, random age method. You're rubbish.

    75. I need to buy a new swimming costume.

    76. Every time I push off the side, I show the entire pool my boobs.

    77. Everyone will probably talk about it once I get out.

    78. "I love swimming here, but I wish that girl didn't insist on showing us her boobs every two minutes."

    79. Hang on, that would be crazy. These people have better things to think about than my boobs.

    80. Do I still have my locker key?

    81. It'd be good if you could listen to music as you swim.

    82. Or if I had one of those length-counter watches.

    83. But they're like, a million pounds.

    84. And if I wore one, everyone would think I was a very serious swimmer, which would mean I'd have to go fast all the time.

    85. I wonder if swimming is bad for your hair.

    86. I'll deep-condition it when I get home.

    87. It'd be bad if scarecrow hair was the price I had to pay for a banging bod.

    88. Ow! Why would you do backstroke in a busy pool?

    89. Thirty! I am so close!

    90. I only have two more lengths, which is basically just one there and back, which is nothing.

    91. I'll try to do front crawl for both.

    92. And I'll try to breathe every third stroke.

    93. OMG I AM DYING, I must breathe every second.

    94. One length left.

    95. I'm gonna do breaststroke.

    96. I've swum a mile.

    97. I deserve it.

    98. I bet I could swim two miles.

    99. I must eat a very large meal.


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    “Donkey Kong had the original fist of Zeus.”

    We're only one week into the NFL season and we might have already seen the league's best touchdown celebration.

    We're only one week into the NFL season and we might have already seen the league's best touchdown celebration.

    Tom Szczerbowski / Getty Images

    Kansas City Chiefs tight end Travis Kelce sent the football flying with an amazing wind-up punch.

    Kansas City Chiefs tight end Travis Kelce sent the football flying with an amazing wind-up punch.

    NFL

    In an interview with NFL Total Access, Kelce claimed the celebration was inspired by none other than Donkey Kong's Giant Punch from Super Smash Bros.

    In an interview with NFL Total Access, Kelce claimed the celebration was inspired by none other than Donkey Kong's Giant Punch from Super Smash Bros.

    Nintendo


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    “YES! YES! YES! YES! YES!”

    Kiara Grindrod is a very special 7-year-old, who just won her battle with cancer. She and her dad were guests at WWE Raw on September 14, 2015, where they got a very special shoutout from John Cena and Sting.

    youtube.com / Via youtube.com

    John Cena took a moment to introduce the crowd to "special fighter" Kiara.

    John Cena took a moment to introduce the crowd to "special fighter" Kiara.

    WWE / Via youtube.com

    He told the crowd, "She has been fighting quite a tough battle, and I'm proud to announce that she won!"

    He told the crowd, "She has been fighting quite a tough battle, and I'm proud to announce that she won!"

    WWE / Via youtube.com

    The fans ERUPTED in the iconic WWE fan chant, "YES! YES! YES! YES!..."

    The fans ERUPTED in the iconic WWE fan chant, "YES! YES! YES! YES!..."

    Kiara is a CHAMPION!

    WWE / Via youtube.com


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    NBA Commissioner Adam Silver spoke candidly about the WNBA on Thursday at a conference on women and sports.

    Adam Silver in July 2015.

    Grant Lamos Iv / Getty Images

    MANHATTAN — NBA Commissioner Adam Silver admitted Thursday that the WNBA is not where it was expected to be by now, nearly 20 years after its debut.

    "We thought we would have broken through by now," Silver said during an interview as part of the Sports Business Journal's Game Changers conference in Manhattan. "We thought ratings and attendance would be higher."

    In 2014, the WNBA-wide average attendance per game was 7,578 fans. The Phoenix Mercury lead the league with an average of 9,557 attendees per game in 2014, and the Tulsa Shock, who will move to Dallas-Fort Worth before the 2016, had the league-worst attendance with an average of 5,566 fans per game.

    "I think we might have been ahead of ourselves 20 years ago in terms of what we were doing," Silver said.

    He went on admit that he feels responsible for the WNBA's tepid popularity today.

    Still, Silver said, "if there were a silver bullet — an easy answer — we would have made the change."

    New York Liberty's Carolyn Swords, left, and Epiphanny Prince defend Connecticut Sun's Jasmine Thomas on Sept. 9.

    Mark Lennihan / AP

    Silver acknowledged that WNBA players have expressed frustration that the marketing of their league feels inauthentic, and said "the onus is on us" to do a better job of presenting the athletes as "multi-dimensional," showcasing their personalities beyond what they do on the court.

    The commissioner pointed to people of influence outside the realm of professional basketball with an ability to help the league grow, specifically media and business partners who he said have largely ignored the WNBA.

    "Leading into the playoffs that begin tonight, there's virtually no coverage," Silver lamented. "People in positions of power have to make a decision that WNBA matters."

    Saying his comments might frame the growth of the WNBA as part of a cause in addition to simply a sport, Silver noted that many companies use feel-good decisions — think Starbucks' announcements of employee benefits — as marketing tactics to attract consumers.


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    Shaun Botterill / Getty Images

    A high-ranking FIFA official has been placed on leave following accusations that he sought to personally profit in a scheme to sell World Cup tickets above face value.

    FIFA announced Thursday that Secretary General Jérôme Valcke had been released from his duties until further notice. The organization also said it was asking for a formal investigation by the FIFA Ethics Committee.

    Valcke — a right-hand man to FIFA President Sepp Blatter — is accused of being involved in a scheme to sell tickets above face value and share in the profits, the Guardian reported. Valcke has denied the allegations, which were made by a consultant whose contract was terminated, possibly before any tickets were sold, according to the Guardian.

    According to a statement from Valcke's lawyer, he "unequivocally denies the fabricated and outrageous accusations," and added that all business between FIFA and the consultant were vetted and approved by the organization's legal team.

    Allegations of corruption have so far left FIFA's top leader, Blatter, relatively untouched. Though the investigation appears to be ongoing, Blatter has not been indicted on any charges and has said he will not resign before his term expires in 2016. However, with the suspension of Valcke, accusation of corruption have inched ever closer.

    Valcke's suspension comes after 14 FIFA officials were arrested on suspicion of corruption, and one former executive admitted to taking bribes.



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    Because you didn’t make the team at your own elite prep school.

    NBC


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    It might start easy, but it gets pretty tricky.


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    Where’s your European Cup?

    How does it feel to know there are now kids in secondary school who have never been alive to see Arsenal win the league?

    How does it feel to know there are now kids in secondary school who have never been alive to see Arsenal win the league?

    Yup, this is a thing.

    Clive Mason / Getty Images

    Where's your European Cup?

    Where's your European Cup?

    Oh.

    Adrian Dennis / AFP / Getty Images

    You do know fourth place isn't actually a trophy, right?

    You do know fourth place isn't actually a trophy, right?

    Your manager's just lost the plot.

    Mike Hewitt / Getty Images


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    “What’s the difference between Eden Hazard and a bus?”

    Ahead of Chelsea vs Arsenal this weekend, we asked Arsenal fans if they wanted to take the piss out of their rivals... and of course they did.

    Ahead of Chelsea vs Arsenal this weekend, we asked Arsenal fans if they wanted to take the piss out of their rivals... and of course they did.

    BuzzFeed / Getty

    In fact, they were more than keen...

    In fact, they were more than keen...

    BuzzFeed / Getty

    There were a few classics:

    There were a few classics:

    BuzzFeed / Charlie Crowhurst / Getty Images

    As well as a few modern classics:

    As well as a few modern classics:

    BuzzFeed / Getty


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    The Real Madrid star brought out a Syrian boy who was being carried by his father when they were tripped by a Hungarian journalist while fleeing, spurring international outrage.

    Ziad, the young refugee boy who was being carried by his father when a Hungarian camerawoman intentionally tripped them, got to walk onto the field Saturday with soccer legend Cristiano Ronaldo.

    Ziad, the young refugee boy who was being carried by his father when a Hungarian camerawoman intentionally tripped them, got to walk onto the field Saturday with soccer legend Cristiano Ronaldo.

    Francisco Seco / AP

    The journalist, identified as Petra Laszlo, was fired and later apologized for her actions.

    Ziad and his father, Osama Alabed Almohse, were among thousands of refugees fleeing Syria and headed to Germany. But when their story became international news, and word spread that Almohse was a soccer coach in Syria, the refugee was invited to teach at CENAFE, a Spanish school in the soccer-crazed nation that trains coaches for the sport.

    Thursday, the father and son met the president of Real Madrid, which Forbes named this year as the most valuable sports team in the world.

    Thursday, the father and son met the president of Real Madrid, which Forbes named this year as the most valuable sports team in the world.

    Real Madrid President Florentino Perez © receives Syrian Refugees Uosama Alabed Almohsen ® and his sons Mohammad (L) and Ziad.

    Antonio Villalba / Getty Images


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