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BuzzFeed has breaking news, vital journalism, quizzes, videos, celeb news, Tasty food videos, recipes, DIY hacks, and all the trending buzz you’ll want to share with your friends. Copyright BuzzFeed, Inc. All rights reserved.

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    Sorry, Wales.

    Wales have achieved the extraordinary this week, not only is the nation of just 3 million inhabitants in the top 10 of the FIFA World Rankings, they have gone above England for the first time ever.

    Wales have achieved the extraordinary this week, not only is the nation of just 3 million inhabitants in the top 10 of the FIFA World Rankings, they have gone above England for the first time ever.

    Wait, is that a mullet?

    Stu Forster / Getty Images

    As if that wasn't already brilliant enough for Welsh sport fans, they are also above England in the World Rugby Rankings – just a few weeks away from the Rugby World Cup.

    As if that wasn't already brilliant enough for Welsh sport fans, they are also above England in the World Rugby Rankings – just a few weeks away from the Rugby World Cup.

    Alex Livesey / Getty Images

    But, not to downplay the recent success of the Welsh football team, the FIFA "Coca Cola" World Rankings have been a point of contention in international football for quite some time. Here is the current top 10.

    But, not to downplay the recent success of the Welsh football team, the FIFA "Coca Cola" World Rankings have been a point of contention in international football for quite some time. Here is the current top 10.

    Now... given that Germany won the World Cup just over a year ago, you'd expect them to be at the top of that pile, and certainly above Belgium, who are currently BELOW Wales in their Euro 2016 qualifying group.

    FIFA

    There IS an alternative to the FIFA World Rankings. It's called the ELO World Rankings, and it's based on a formula developed by *consults the internet* Hungarian mathematician Dr. Árpád Élő. It's mainly used to rate chess players.

    There IS an alternative to the FIFA World Rankings. It's called the ELO World Rankings, and it's based on a formula developed by *consults the internet* Hungarian mathematician Dr. Árpád Élő. It's mainly used to rate chess players.

    Who you gonna believe – this guy, or Sepp Blatter?

    Creative Commons


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    Make your Snack game BEAST MODE. “HOLD MA DIP”

    BuzzFeed Blue / Via youtu.be


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    NOTE: This quiz does not accept strawberry blondes, or people who just have ginger beards.


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    ESPN announced Friday that the Olympic gold medalist will appear as an analyst for their Sunday Night Baseball broadcasts for the rest of the MLB season. On Thursday, Curt Schilling was booted from a similar role.

    Jessica Mendoza

    ESPN announced Friday that former Olympic softball player Jessica Mendoza has been added to the Sunday Night Baseball broadcast team for the remainder of the 2015 MLB season, along with the AL Wild Card game.

    Mendoza made history on August 24 when she became the first woman at ESPN to call an MLB game. A week later, Mendoza called the Cubs–Dodgers game on Sunday Night Baseball, during which Cubs pitcher Jake Arrieta threw a no-hitter.

    According to ESPN's announcement Friday, Mendoza will appear for the final three Sunday Night Baseball games of the regular MLB season, plus the AL Wild Card game. ESPN does not have broadcast rights to any playoff games beyond the Wild Card.

    Mendoza was a starting outfielder for the USA Softball Women's National Team during the 2004 and 2008 Olympics. In college, she and her Stanford teammates appeared in the Women's College World Series. Mendoza now was an announcer for the Women's College World Series for ESPN, and this year called the men's College World Series.

    Mendoza's rise in ESPN ranks coincided with fellow analyst and former MLB pitcher Curt Schilling's troubles with the cable sports network.

    On Thursday, Schilling was booted from the Sunday Night Baseball broadcast team for the remainder of the MLB season, along with the AL Wild Card game. Schilling was pulled from the schedule after he tweeted an image macro comparing Muslim extremists to Nazis.

    ESPN first pulled Schilling off the Little League World Series broadcast. After sitting out the week, Schilling exacerbated the situation by sending a rambling email to a reporter in which he questioned the reporter's integrity and made a snide comment about a fellow ESPN reporter.

    The statement issued Thursday by ESPN was uncharacteristically candid, saying Schilling's actions have "not been consistent with his contractual obligations nor have they been professionally handled; they have obviously not reflected well on the company."

    In Schilling's lengthy email to a reporter, he credited Mendoza's work as an analyst for its own merits:

    "My suspension or not she deserves to be in a booth calling MLB games. Not to break a barrier, not to enter a new frontier, but because she earned it. She's one of the few still understanding if you work your ass off you can do what you dream."

    ESPN has not made a decision about the Sunday Night Baseball tenure of Schilling nor Mendoza beyond the AL Wild Card game. Mendoza's next appearance will be Sunday, September 6, when division rivals St. Louis and Pittsburgh go head-to-head.

    LINK: Curt Schilling Booted From ESPN Broadcasts For Remainder Of MLB Season

    LINK: ESPN Pulls Curt Schilling From Sunday Night Baseball Broadcast For Tweeting A Nazi Meme


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    Tom Brady leaves federal court on Monday.

    Mary Altaffer / AP

    Tom Brady — the Patriots quarterback who successfully fought a four-game suspension for his alleged role in deflating footballs during the AFC Championship Game — had a message for weary fans Friday night: Deflategate is over, I'm back, and I'm ready.

    "The regular season starts tomorrow morning and I can’t wait to fully commit my energy and emotion to focus on the challenges of the 2015 NFL season," he said in a Facebook post Friday night.

    He went on to thank the federal judge who earlier this week criticized the NFL's handling of the disciplinary process as it investigated deflated footballs used during the championship game.

    I am very grateful. My thanks also to the union's legal team who has fought so hard right along with me.

    While I am pleased to be eligible to play, I am sorry our league had to endure this. I don’t think it has been good for our sport — to a large degree, we have all lost.

    I am also sorry to anyone whose feelings I may have hurt as I have tried to work to resolve this situation.


    Judge Richard Berman on Thursday sided with Brady and the NFL Players Association in voiding the four-game suspension imposed by NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.

    New England Patriots fans on Sept. 3.

    Winslow Townson / AP

    Berman, who took particular aim at Goodell in his blistering ruling, did not directly address the burning question of whether Brady knew or played a role in deflating the footballs, thereby making them easier to throw and grasp. But after weeks of back-and-forth legal minutiae and courtroom drama, the court of NFL fandom seemed to take the judge's decision as a sweeping victory for the champion quarterback, eager to leave the drama behind.

    On Friday, the Washington Post, citing anonymous sources, also reported that NFL team owners were set to discuss possibly changing Goodell's role in the player disciplinary process in light of Berman's ruling.

    LINK: Judge Overturns Tom Brady’s Four-Game Suspension

    LINK: Patriots Owner: “I Was Wrong To Put My Faith In The League”



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    Stay classy, Kansas State.

    The two schools' teams are rivals, but weren't even playing each other at the time.

    ESPN / Via brobible.com


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    England play San Marino this weekend, but do you know ANY players?

    Can you guess whether these are characters from "The Godfather" films, or players for San Marino?

    Can you guess whether these are characters from "The Godfather" films, or players for San Marino?

    Paramount / BuzzFeed


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    youtube.com


    Two high school football players from a school near San Antonio, Texas were suspended and could face charges, after ramming into a referee during game Friday night, according to KSAT.

    The two defensive backs from John Jay High School hit the referee in the last moments of the game against Marble Falls High School. Video of the incident shows the referee, Robert Watts, who was watching the play from behind the defensive line, get hit from behind from by Victor Rojas. The hit caused the referee’s head to snap back. A second player, Michael Moreno, is then seen piling on to the referee who was already on the ground.

    The two players have been suspended from school and the team, according to a statement released by the Northside Independent School District.

    “The incident is extremely disturbing,” Pascual Gonzalez, Northside Independent School District executive director of communications said in a statement. “Not the sportsmanlike behavior we teach students.”

    Gonzalez said the school will launch an investigation, including interviews with student athletes and the coaching staff, on Tuesday.

    The referee was “very upset” and is considering pressing charges, Austin Football Officials Association secretary Wayne Elliott said according to ESPN.

    "The first thing we want is that those two kids never play football again," Elliott said.

    Earlier in the game, two John Jay players were ejected from the game during a separate incident.

    “The [Texas University Interscholastic League] is extremely concerned about the actions portrayed in the football game between Marble Falls and San Antonio Jay,” the UIL said in statement. “The League is working with the school districts and officials involved to conduct a thorough investigation. The UIL takes this matter very seriously and will take appropriate action once the investigation is complete.”

    Marble Falls coach Matt Green said that John Jay coach Gary Gutierrez apologized after the game, according to the Associated Press.

    “I’ve coached 14 years, and I’ve never seen anything like it,” Green said.


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    In your next edition of Aussies killing it overseas…

    Earlier this week, former NRL player and Aussie superstar Jarryd Hayne officially made the San Francisco 49ers, becoming part of the team's final 53-man roster.

    Earlier this week, former NRL player and Aussie superstar Jarryd Hayne officially made the San Francisco 49ers, becoming part of the team's final 53-man roster.

    Look at that steely-eyed determination.

    Ezra Shaw / Getty Images

    Aussie Squad Goals ❤️❤️❤️

    Aussie Squad Goals ❤️❤️❤️

    Wikipedia.org / Creative Commons


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    From the stands, Jay Mullen didn’t like what he saw. He didn’t like that the Soviet basketball team was humiliating its overmatched Ugandan opponents. He didn’t like that the visitors were bigger, stronger, faster, and more skilled than the amateurish Ugandan army and prison guard teams. He didn’t like that the Soviets were outscoring, out-rebounding, and out-everythinging the home team, and didn’t like that they were throwing the ball off the backboard and dunking it. They were putting on a Harlem Globetrotters–type show and the Ugandans were the Generals.

    The Soviets had arrived in Kampala a few days earlier, and now they were showing why they had come: to dominate. Winning these two initial games by more than 60 points apiece, they displayed the skills that made them the best team in the Soviet Union and in Europe. They were also showing, Mullen thought, a complete lack of respect and humility. Next, they would be playing Mullen’s team, the best Uganda had to offer. As he watched the Soviets pummel the locals, it made Mullen want to retaliate, to wound the visiting team’s estimable pride, and to regain it for the Ugandans. And if he could serve his own country at the same time, then so be it. That idea, he liked.

    In 1972, in the middle of the Cold War, the Soviet military sent a team of all-stars to Kampala to compete in three goodwill basketball games against Uganda’s top players. The Soviets, who were hoping to curry favor with the leader of the new regime, Idi Amin, didn’t know that the best of the three squads, the Ugandan national team, was at that time being coached by an American named Jay Mullen. And they definitely didn’t know that Mullen was an undercover CIA operative, sent to Uganda earlier that year to spy on the Soviets.

    The space race was winding down, but the nuclear arms race was accelerating at a perilous rate despite talks of limitations. U.S.-backed coups were happening all over the world. Courting and deposing regional leaders was a global game being played by dangerous men. At a moment when any shift in the balance of power could lead to Cold War escalation between the USSR and U.S., the team from the USSR had been invited by the Ugandan Ministry of Defence as a way to show solidarity between the militaries of this East African country and the Eastern Bloc.

    A coup supported by the CIA was partially responsible for the series of events that led to this athletic standoff — an uncelebrated moment in the annals of Cold War sports that includes the Miracle on Ice and boycotts at the 1980 and 1984 Olympics. For decades, the Cold War was played on the field, the pitch, and the basketball court. Victories for individual athletes were seen as triumphs for superpowers, for capitalist or communist ways of life.

    Mullen was the coach of the Ugandan national basketball team for six months under the reign of Idi Amin. During that short time, he would turn a team of amateurs — the first generation of Ugandan basketball players — into a proxy army against the USSR’s propaganda tour. “I’m a competitive guy and, number one, I wanted to win,” he told me. “Number two, I’m competing for the hearts and minds of the world, and if I could in some microscopic way derail this thing of theirs, I would’ve enjoyed that, and I almost felt an obligation to try.” If the Soviets were trying to impress Ugandan leaders by winning a basketball game, he would do everything in his power to make them lose.

    In March, I visited Mullen in southern Oregon, where he has been living for almost 40 years. Ever since our first conversation in 2013, the tall, white-haired history professor had not stopped asking me, “Did you follow that?” — checking in as he breathlessly shared stories from his travels and how they intertwined with historical events.

    At home with Mullen, I could see how he would be the right person for the CIA job. His 46-year-old son, Tobey, told me that Mullen often speaks without words, pointing at things he wants. I witnessed as much, but I also saw him initiate conversations with strangers like it was nothing, breaking the ice with at least three different people by asking if they had Nordic ancestry. At dinner one night, without warning, he broke into the New Zealand national anthem, not the last anthem he would sing during my visit. The guy can listen, schmooze, or entertain as needed.

    Before I arrived, he suggested that we talk while driving to and from the coast, where we’d be dropping off his teenage granddaughter at surf camp. Mullen spent nearly the entire three-hour trip to Gold Beach explaining the genesis of World War II to his granddaughter while she sat half-listening in the backseat of my rental car. “Did you follow that?” he asked her, often, while listing the many types of people the Nazis hated.

    As the two of us drove back alone, Mullen began to tell me how the hell an academic originally from southeastern Missour-uh ended up taking his young family to Uganda only months after one of modern history’s most notorious dictators took power.

    In 1970, Mullen and his wife, Nancy Jo, were living in Kentucky, where he was teaching history courses at Midway College. This was during the Vietnam War, which Mullen staunchly opposed and protested against. The administration at his school told him he had to shave his beard, considered a symbol of “treason” at the time, according to Mullen. “I told them to go fuck themselves,” he said. “And so I had to find a new job.”

    He and Nancy Jo had also just adopted a Native American son, and then had another child who was born with severe and expensive health problems. Mullen sent form letters to all sorts of places looking for work. “I believe I have credentials that would be of interest to you,” he wrote to Xerox. “I believe I have credentials that would be of interest to you,” he wrote to the Tennessee Valley Authority. “I believe I have credentials that would be of interest to you,” he wrote to the CIA.

    One night Mullen got a call from a guy who said he was with “the agency.” Mullen didn’t know if he meant the home loan agency or any of the other entities that he’d sent letters to in search of employment. As it turned out, the CIA was interested in his credentials. Then in his early thirties, Mullen was finishing up his dissertation on the influence of Indians on British colonial policy in East Africa, and he had earned a fellowship to study Wolof, a West African language, at the University of Indiana.

    Jay Mullen and his kids Tobey and Molly in Uganda

    Courtesy of Umeeda Switlo

    After doing a background check, the CIA asked him to come to Washington, D.C., despite his antigovernment past. “They didn’t care,” he told me. “As long as I could be inserted there and provide information, they didn’t give a goddamn if I worked for Che Guevara.” It was difficult to plausibly place operatives in African nations outside of embassy jobs, but with his academic bona fides, Mullen was fit to work under non-official cover, as a NOC.

    With the approval of Nancy Jo, herself excited to try something new, Mullen joined the CIA, and, in September 1971, after an accelerated eight-week training, he and his family left for Uganda’s capital, Kampala. He would be posing as a researcher on African history; there were plenty of other Americans and Brits at Makerere University among whom Mullen could blend in. But his real job would be to get to know the Kampala-based Soviets.

    At first, Mullen told me he was in Kampala as “just another set of eyes and ears” for the CIA, but he quickly corrected himself. “That’s probably a little too cute,” he admitted. “I was actually managing a ring of assets, as we called them. Some people call them a spy ring.” His assets were mostly Ugandans recruited to help gather information on the Russians living in Kampala in order to turn them into double agents. Not all of them understood what they were doing or whom they were doing it for. In the agency, Mullen said, “you recruit all kinds of people who don’t even know they’re recruited or why.”

    Getting to know Russians, who were themselves trying to find Americans to spy for their side, meant going to social events once or twice a week, and drinking a whole lot. He’d meet Soviets at parties and write reports describing every detail of their mostly mundane conversations. Sometimes Nancy Jo would come along, to dance with (and gather information on) the single Russian men. The reports, along with the contents of tapped phone calls and other gathered intelligence, would be used by experts in D.C. to determine which Soviets might be willing to turn and work for the Americans. “Every one of them was a candidate,” Mullen said.

    The Cold War was in full effect when Mullen arrived in Kampala. In this post-African-independence period, both the Americans and the Soviets were trying to spread their ideals to Africa, occasionally by hook and more often by crook. African leaders who showed signs, or were thought to show signs, of moving to the left — i.e., toward communism and away from capitalism — were strongly “encouraged” by American agencies to step down.

    Milton Obote, the president of Uganda starting in 1966, was one such leader who made Americans wary. The CIA did not directly support the January 1971 military coup that took Obote out of power, but declassified British government documents have shown that the Israelis, and to a lesser extent the British, did, while the Americans cheered and eventually provided weapons to the new man in charge — the civilized world’s hope for Uganda, the man destined to foster under his leadership a new era of capitalist Western-style democracy, the despot known as Big Daddy: Idi Amin.

    Amin’s coup happened only months before Mullen arrived in the country, and so it was under his regime that Mullen spied on the Russians. Amin had joined the King’s African Rifles, a British colonial unit, in 1946, and had trained in the U.K. and Israel. He was a big, charismatic man, a heavyweight boxing champion, and he became a Western symbol of African leadership for a short while. “Amin burst into the presidency, like Obote before him, through the barrel of a gun,” wrote historian Phares Mutibwa, “stumbling on to the pages of history.”

    Amin’s reign has become famous for its brutality, but at the time of the coup it was greeted by many Ugandans with great cheer. Obote had begun physically eliminating or detaining his enemies. He’d expelled Kenyan industrial workers and used the military and police to maintain shaky yet violent control of the country. Change was welcome when Amin came to power and immediately released 55 political detainees. He spoke of halting widespread corruption, lowering taxes, holding organized elections, and stemming bloodshed. The coup was supposed to mark a new beginning for Uganda.

    But Amin’s honeymoon period would not last long. As many as half a million Ugandans were killed under his regime, including hundreds, if not thousands, of prominent civil servants, academics, senior military officers, cabinet ministers, diplomats, educators, church leaders, and doctors. Anyone who posed a threat to the control of the country was eliminated. In a 1972 memo, one British ambassador described the situation in Uganda as “absolute hell.”

    As the risks of being stationed in Uganda became more and more apparent, foreign governments began pulling out their personnel. The exodus from Uganda, said Mullen, was “like rats leaving a sinking ship.” One of the people who fled Kampala after the coup was the Ugandan national basketball team’s coach, a Yugoslav. With the trials for the Pan African Games — a continental version of the Olympics — coming up and a group of Soviet ballers on their way, the Ugandan team needed a new coach. Amin’s coup and the ensuing violence in Uganda had cleared the way for Mullen to step in.

    When he wasn’t spying on the Soviets, Mullen spent time with his wife and kids, taught classes at Makerere University, and played outdoor basketball at the YMCA. Basketball had come to Uganda only a few years earlier, in the 1960s, through Peace Corps volunteers and missionaries. Those playing in the early 1970s were true pioneers of the sport in Uganda. Cyrus Muwanga was one of them.

    “I started playing basketball probably when the first Ugandans played the game,” Muwanga, now a 66-year-old retired hand surgeon in County Durham, England, told me. As a young boy, he learned the sport from Americans who taught at his school. He and his friends would play on a grassy field or packed dirt lot.

    Jay Mullen refereeing a YMCA basketball game in Uganda.

    Courtesy of Jay Mullen

    “It was so rough, at first we thought that we’re not supposed to bounce the ball,” Muwanga said. “We’d just run.” But learning to dribble on a rough surface, which they did for two or three years before moving to a proper court, proved to be an advantage: “When you actually move to a smooth court, it’s quite easy.”

    Muwanga and his schoolmates also became good shooters because they were initially playing on backboard-less netball hoops. Accuracy is key when only a swish gets you a bucket.

    When Muwanga finished high school, he had to choose which college to attend for his A-levels. His father wanted him to go to the school that was the best academically. “I chose the school with a good basketball court,” Muwanga told me, following with the long, deep laugh that he attached to every basketball-related memory.

    Hilary Onek (left) at the opening of the St. Mary's College Kisubi basketball court.

    Via visitugandaschools.blogspot.com

    The Aga Khan School, where Muwanga took his pre-university courses, would compete against a Catholic school 15 miles down the road called St. Mary’s College Kisubi, which had three proper basketball courts. One of the St. Mary’s players was a cocky, tall drink of water named Hilary Onek.

    As a younger kid, Onek had never even heard of basketball. “I didn’t know anything about it,” he told me from his office in Uganda, where he is a member of parliament. But at Kisubi, he found out about this American game where you shoot a ball through a metal hoop. His teachers singled him out for instruction because of his height. Soon, he was dominating. “I could outjump all of them,” Onek said. “I was probably the strongest player on the team.” Onek also had an older classmate named James Okwera, a great athlete and basketball star despite the fact that he didn’t start playing until he was 16. With Cyrus Muwanga holding court at Aga Khan, competitions between the schools were fierce. “When Aga Khan played Kisubi, it was a war,” Muwanga said.

    The St. Mary’s College Kisubi basketball team.

    Irene Tyaba

    “Aga Khan came second to us a lot of the time,” Okwera told me. “But they had some really good players, and my friend Cyrus was one of them, so whenever we were playing them, it was always a very tense rivalry.” In his last year at the school — during a somewhat more relaxed, if still politically unstable, pre-coup period in Uganda — the two teams played for the national school championship, with Kisubi coming away with a one-point victory. The players from both schools pushed each other to improve, and by the time they were moving on to university studies, Onek, Muwanga, Okwera, and their friends were taking the game seriously.

    Muwanga and his Aga Khan schoolmate Ivan Kyeyune were Baganda; Hilary Onek and James Okwera were Acholi. At various times under Obote and Amin, members of each of their tribes were being murdered and coming into and out of power. But they say politics didn’t matter when they were on the court, and especially when they all ended up on the national team. “I don’t think that ever came across anybody’s mind,” Okwera told me. “We all trained as one, and played as one.”

    Getty Images


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    IT’S COMING HOME, IT’S COMING HOME, IT’S COMING!


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    No one makes The Fed wait.

    The often-calm Roger Federer had his patience tested when the umpire allowed his round four US Open opponent John Isner to change kits in the locker room.

    The often-calm Roger Federer had his patience tested when the umpire allowed his round four US Open opponent John Isner to change kits in the locker room.

    Eduardo Munoz / Reuters

    Isner went over the allotted 120 seconds between sets, leaving the Swiss champ clearly irked. Despite his annoyance, Federer still displayed pure class and showed how one should deal with waiting.

    Isner went over the allotted 120 seconds between sets, leaving the Swiss champ clearly irked. Despite his annoyance, Federer still displayed pure class and showed how one should deal with waiting.

    Eduardo Munoz / Reuters

    Pace back and forth on the court.

    Pace back and forth on the court.

    US Open / Fox Sports

    Showcase your exceptional ball skills.

    Showcase your exceptional ball skills.

    US Open / Fox Sports


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    The Swans star is suffering from a mental health issue.

    Sydney Swans superstar Lance Franklin has pulled out of this weekend's crucial AFL qualifying final against Fremantle due to ongoing mental health issues.

    Sydney Swans superstar Lance Franklin has pulled out of this weekend's crucial AFL qualifying final against Fremantle due to ongoing mental health issues.

    Matt King / Getty Images

    In a statement on the club's website, the Swans said Franklin was being treated for an unspecified condition.

    "Our first priority is looking after Lance's health," General Manager of Football, Tom Harley said.

    "Lance has been open with the club about his condition and while we consider it a private medical matter, he is aware he has our full support.

    "The timeframe on his return is unclear at this stage. He will certainly miss this week's match and we will continue to monitor his condition.

    But the Swans say they've "wrapped their arms" around Franklin as he recovers.

    But the Swans say they've "wrapped their arms" around Franklin as he recovers.

    Matt King / Getty Images

    "It's a shock to a lot of the boys … we can just support him as a player group and as a footy club, and that's what we'll do," Swans coach John Longmire said.

    "We're right behind him, we support him fully, and footy's the last thing on our minds in regards to his health.

    "All the players have spoken about it and we're fully behind him."


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    The Matildas are on strike.

    Australia's women's soccer team has taken the extraordinary step of going on strike, saying the players are not being respected by the body that runs the game

    Australia's women's soccer team has taken the extraordinary step of going on strike, saying the players are not being respected by the body that runs the game

    Bradley Kanaris / Getty Images

    "This decision has not been taken lightly, however the players feel they have been left with little option as the current proposal is simply unacceptable," Professional Footballers Australia Chief Executive Adam Vivian said.

    "FFA has failed to recognise the significant sacrifices the Matildas players are forced to make in playing for their country."

    Negotiations with the FFA had been going on for six months, but no deal had been reached before the players' collective bargaining agreement lapsed in July -- meaning the players are under no contractual obligation to attend the training camps.

    The PFA says Australia's female players, who made the quarter finals at this year's World Cup, are not paid enough and are not given access to a high-performance training environment, which limits their ability to expand the women's game in Australia.

    The Matildas were due to attend the training camp this week before flying out for a tour of the U.S., which was seen as crucial in the build up to next year's Olympic qualifiers.

    Matildas goalkeeper Lydia Williams said the strike was a last resort after months of negotiations with the sport's governing body, Football Federation Australia.

    Matildas goalkeeper Lydia Williams said the strike was a last resort after months of negotiations with the sport's governing body, Football Federation Australia.

    Matt King / Getty Images

    "This was an extremely difficult decision to make," said Williams. "However it's simply unfair to continue to expect us to make enormous sacrifices to play for Australia," she said.

    "For the past two months the players have been unpaid and have made every attempt to reach an agreement that gives the women's game a platform for growth.

    "This is about the future of Australian football. We want to establish football as the sport of choice for Australian women, and we want to be one of the best nations in the world."

    Matildas players also say they were disrespected by FFA boss David Gallop, who designated A-League boss Damien De Bohun to lead negotiations, FourFourTwo reports.


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    No, this isn’t divine power, just mad skills.

    This is Shi Liliang. He's a Shaolin monk from Quanzhou, China, and here he is running on water.

    On Aug. 29, Liliang ran for 125 meters across a reservoir, supported only by pieces of floating plywood.

    Liliang uses the small boards for traction as he skips across the water using strength in his toes. He has spent the last 10 years improving his skills.

    He already made headlines last year for running for 118 meters across water. This January, he pushed the distance to 120.


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    The New York Jets center took a pen out of his legendary beard and took a geography test.

    While he was visiting the UK ahead of the new NFL season, we asked New York Jets center Nick Mangold to label Premier League football clubs on a map. This is how he got on...

    While he was visiting the UK ahead of the new NFL season, we asked New York Jets center Nick Mangold to label Premier League football clubs on a map. This is how he got on...

    BuzzFeed / EA Sports

    1. First up... Chelsea. Here's what Nick went for:

    1. First up... Chelsea. Here's what Nick went for:

    BuzzFeed

    Verdict: NOPE.

    Verdict: NOPE.

    It's fine, he's just getting warmed up... that's all.

    BuzzFeed

    2. Next... Norwich City. Nick went east:

    2. Next... Norwich City. Nick went east:

    But maybe not far enough east.

    BuzzFeed


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    Fairy dust FTW!

    Rayssa Leal is a fashionable fan of skating in Imperatriz, Brazil. She tries to land a sick trick without her fairy wings and doesn't quite make it. But the moment they're on she crushes it.

    View Video ›

    Rayssa Leal / Via Facebook: video.php

    Almost, girl, almost!

    Almost, girl, almost!

    Rayssa Leal / Via Facebook: video.php

    Leal goes for her trick for the second time...

    Leal goes for her trick for the second time...

    ...but falls flat again.

    Rayssa Leal / Via Facebook: video.php

    But that's OK, because the moment she puts on her magical fairy wings she completely dominates.

    But that's OK, because the moment she puts on her magical fairy wings she completely dominates.

    YOU GO, GIRL!

    Rayssa Leal / Via Facebook: video.php


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    Two forces that have been at opposition since the beginning of time.

    BuzzFeed Video / Via youtu.be


    0 0

    It’s nearly two whole months until Halloween.

    England took on Switzerland at Wembley on Tuesday night, but it wasn't the on-pitch action that immediately grabbed the attention of viewers.

    England took on Switzerland at Wembley on Tuesday night, but it wasn't the on-pitch action that immediately grabbed the attention of viewers.

    Steve Bardens - The Fa / Getty Images

    Fans at home noticed a very, very faded Ladbrokes sign, and started questioning whether their TVs were broken.

    Fans at home noticed a very, very faded Ladbrokes sign, and started questioning whether their TVs were broken.

    Twitter


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    The Williams sisters have met 14 times in Grand Slam events, 27 times in total.

    Rick Stevens / ASSOCIATED PRESS

    2000 Wimbledon, semifinals.

    2000 Wimbledon, semifinals.

    Venus beats Serena in two sets: 6–2, 7–6.

    DAVE CAULKIN / AP Images

    DAVE CAULKIN / AP Images.


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