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    Warning: Every mic is a hot mic. Nigel Hayes’s reaction is pretty adorable, though.

    This is No. 1-ranked University of Wisconsin Badgers basketball player Nigel Hayes.

    This is No. 1-ranked University of Wisconsin Badgers basketball player Nigel Hayes.

    Mark J. Terrill / AP

    His team is competing in the NCAA Tournament, and the second-year forward has given some ~rather entertaining~ press conferences lately.

    His team is competing in the NCAA Tournament, and the second-year forward has given some ~rather entertaining~ press conferences lately.

    Charlie Neibergall / AP

    Hayes is fascinated by stenographers. Last week, during a pre-game press conference, Hayes tested the stenographer's skills by rattling off a random list of wonky words.

    Hayes is fascinated by stenographers. Last week, during a pre-game press conference, Hayes tested the stenographer's skills by rattling off a random list of wonky words.

    Before he answered a reporter's question, Hayes said, "I'd like to say a few words: cattywampus, onomatopoeia, and antidisestablishmentarianism."

    USA Today / Via usatoday.com

    When reporters asked about the tongue-twisters, Hayes told them, "She does an amazing job typing words," and that "If I say a word like soliloquy right now, she may have to work a little bit harder to type that word. Or quandary, zephyr, xylophone, things like that, that make her job more interesting."


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    The late UNC coach’s trust sent letters to about 180 former players this month informing them of the gift.

    Legendary UNC men's basketball coach Dean Smith passed away last month at age 83, but his players just got a reminder of how much he cared for them.

    Legendary UNC men's basketball coach Dean Smith passed away last month at age 83, but his players just got a reminder of how much he cared for them.

    Getty Images/Doug Pensinger

    The trustee confirmed the gift to the players to the Associated Press.

    The letters told the players to "enjoy a dinner out compliments of Coach Dean Smith."

    Former player Serge Zwikker told ESPN he was incredibly moved by the gesture.

    Former player Serge Zwikker told ESPN he was incredibly moved by the gesture.

    "My wife opened the letter and handed it to me," he said. "At first I didn't know what it was, but when it hit me, it put a tear in my eye. Even after he passed, he was still all about his players."

    Jeff Taylor / Reuters


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    The 25-year-old mother of the former New England Patriots star’s daughter must make a difficult choice today.

    Ted Fitzgerald / AP

    Shayanna Jenkins is not in an enviable position.

    Jenkins, Aaron Hernandez's 25-year-old fianceé and the mother of his daughter, is expected to be called to the witness stand Friday in his trial for the murder of Odin Lloyd. In February, she was granted immunity from criminal charges in exchange for testifying against him. If she takes the stand and refuses to speak, she'll be charged with contempt of court. However, prosecutors hope she will flip and testify against Hernandez, the father of her 2-year-old daughter, Avielle.

    In this murder trial — the first of two that Hernandez faces this year — Jenkins plays a central role.

    The victim, Odin Lloyd, was the boyfriend of Shayanna's sister, Shaneah. Hernandez and Lloyd were introduced by the sisters, though Shaneah has testified that the men were little more than cordial acquaintances. Shayanna is positioned to choose between potentially betraying her sister or her fianceé, with whom she has a child.

    If she testifies against Hernandez, and tells the jury that he is guilty, he will have little left in his defense.

    If she does not, she will be held in contempt of court and jailed until the end of the trial, which would leave her child with both parents in jail. And if she does not testify against him and Hernandez is found not guilty, he still faces another trial for a 2012 double homicide, along with multiple charges of owning firearms without a permit. Also, jurors could still find Hernandez guilty on forensic evidence if she does not choose to testify.

    Jenkins has had a lot of scenarios to consider. If her attorney has advised her to take the risk of contempt, it's possible she's doubtful of the prosecutor's case against Hernandez.

    Before the trial, the Bristol County sheriff said he would not allow Hernandez and Jenkins to marry. Even so, Massachusetts state law only awards spousal privilege for incidents that occurred after the date of marriage, not before.

    Prosecutors have spent two months building their case against Hernandez, and he's caught few, if any breaks, with evidence against him. Experts have testified that a shoe print that was found near Odin Lloyd's body match a pair of Air Jordans Hernandez was seen wearing the night of the homicide. A bullet casing found in the rental car Hernandez was driving the night of the homicide was recovered and matched to the other casings found at the scene. Surveillance video from Hernandez's own home shows him walking around carrying a Glock the morning of Lloyd's murder. Despite the arsenal of circumstantial evidence, prosecutors have yet to establish a potential motive, and the murder weapon was never recovered.

    Shayanna Jenkins could clear those loose ends up. Testimony so far has insinuated that she threw away the murder weapon — a Glock .45 — at Hernandez's direction. Shayanna's sister, Shaneah, and the Hernandez family housekeeper have both testified to seeing Shayanna leave the house with a large black trash bag with a box-shaped object in it the day after Lloyd's murder. Shayanna borrowed her sister's car, and told her she was going to the bank to get cash to pay the housekeeper, who later testified that she was paid with a check. Both witnesses have described Shayanna as being "anxious" that day.

    Attorneys for both sides have been arguing this week over whether or not to admit transcripts of phone conversations Hernandez made from prison, which are not privileged. He had multiple conversations about creating trust funds for the children of his terminally ill cousin, Tanya Singleton, who has been charged with accessory to murder and sentenced to home confinement for contempt of court. Prosecutors hope Jenkins will tell them Hernandez was paying off potential witnesses against him, but defense attorneys will make the claim that he was trying to support the children of a dying woman.

    Shayanna has not appeared in court for three weeks, but reports from the courtroom say she is present Friday, and wearing her engagement ring.


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    Luckily, he was conscious when he was transported to the hospital.

    Immediately after kickoff in a Russia–Montenegro match, Russian goalkeeper Igor Akinfee was hit in the head by a flare tossed from the stands.

    vine.co


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    The day after Odin Lloyd was murdered, Shayanna Jenkins disposed of a large box at Hernandez’s request. She maintains that she had no idea what was inside.

    WBZ TV

    Shayanna Jenkins, Aaron Hernandez's fianceé and mother of his child, continued her testimony in his murder trial Monday by answering a series of questions about a box that prosecutors said contained the murder weapon.

    Hernandez is accused of the 2013 murder of Odin Lloyd, who was the boyfriend of Shayanna's sister, Shaneah, at the time of his death.

    Shayanna removed the box, covered in a black bag, from their home the day after Lloyd was murdered. She that Hernandez called her and told her it was "important" for her to dispose of a large cardboard box that was kept in their storage room, but she says she never learned what it contained. Prosecutors allege the murder weapon — a Glock .45 — was in this box.

    During her testimony, Shayanna was asked if Hernandez ever told her what was in the box. She said he did not, and said she never asked. When prosecutors asked if she rummaged through the box, she said she did not. She told the jury that all she saw in the box were a few smaller boxes and some clothing. She says she added baby clothing to the top of the box, but quickly mentioned that she was not concealing its contents.

    According to her memory, the box was roughly 35 to 40 pounds.

    During cross-examination by Hernandez's attorney, he asked if the box was maybe closer to 25 pounds. Shayanna had previously indicated that the box was about the same weight as her daughter, who was 25 pounds at the time.

    Hernandez's attorney asked Shayanna if she smelled anything in the box, and she said it smelled "funky," and she believes it might have contained marijuana. This is the first time she has offered a theory about what the box might have contained.

    Footage from the home's surveillance system shows Shayanna carrying the large bag and box out through the backyard and bringing it to the driveway to put it in the trunk of her sister's car. She said she didn't put it in the backseat because it was too large.

    Shayanna told the jury that she does not remember the site where she disposed of the box, saying the emotions of everyone around her – including Shaneah and Hernandez – were weighing on her and made her nervous. She says she drove around southern Massachusetts aimlessly, trying to shake off nerves.

    Shayanna was granted an immunity deal in exchange for testifying in February, and there was speculation about how she would approach her obligation to take the stand. When it was clear that she was not going to remain silent, which would likely lead to contempt of court charges, the next question was about how much she would say. Would she flip on Hernandez and give the prosecutors strong evidence? Would she speak as obligated but claim she couldn't remember details, large or small, about the days leading up to Hernandez's arrest? Or would she lie, and risk perjury charges to protect Hernandez?

    Boston Globe

    Earlier in the trial, her sister Shaneah testified that Shayanna told her she needed to borrow her car to get money to pay the housekeepers. Shaneah said it was unusual for Shayanna to borrow her car, and that she seemed anxious when she left the house. A housekeeper later testified that Shayanna paid them with a check.

    On Monday, a copy of that check was shown to the jury.

    Surveillance video showed Shayanna at an ATM in Plainville, Mass. during her outing the day after Lloyd was murdered. A bank statement showed that Shayanna withdrew $800 from the ATM in Plainville, and $500 from an ATM in East Greenwich earlier that day. When asked why she was withdrawing money, Shayanna told the jury she needed to pay the housekeepers.

    The prosecutor showed a photo of a $300 check made out to her housekeeper for "Weekly Cleaning."

    Prosecutors did not give any reasons for her $1,300 withdrawal, but on Friday Shayanna testified that she went to Rhode Island to meet with a Hernandez co-defendant to give him some money at Hernandez's request.

    Shayanna maintained that she had no further conversations with Hernandez about the removal of the mysterious box, and what it might have contained.

    Courtroom reporters say Shaneah Jenkins left the courtroom in tears as her sister testified about where she went and why on the day after Odin Lloyd was murdered. She returned a few minutes later.


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    The Cleveland Browns general manager will also be punished for sending text messages to the sidelines during games, according to reports.

    The use of a cell phone on multiple occasions during games in 2014 by Cleveland Browns General Manager Ray Farmer was a violation of NFL rules that prohibit certain uses of electronic devices during games. Based on these violations, the Browns have been fined $250,000 and Ray Farmer will be suspended without pay for the first four regular-season games of the 2015 season. The suspension will start on midnight of the Sunday preceding the Browns' first regular-season game and will end immediately after the Browns' fourth regular-season game. During the period of the suspension, Farmer cannot be involved in any club matters and is prohibited from being at the Browns' offices, practice facility, or at Browns games.


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    Kraft was only questioned for about an hour.

    Patriots owner Robert Kraft testified Tuesday in former Patriots player Aaron Hernandez's murder trial. His appearance as a witness comes as the prosecution prepares to rest their case.

    Patriots owner Robert Kraft testified Tuesday in former Patriots player Aaron Hernandez's murder trial. His appearance as a witness comes as the prosecution prepares to rest their case.

    CBS Boston

    Kraft said that he worked for the Patriots, then said his job is to do "whatever they ask me to do."

    His testimony shed hardly any light on the experience of being an NFL team owner, but Kraft later testified that he didn't follow details about Hernandez's recruitment or the contract extension the Patriots gave him less than a year before his arrest.

    Kraft said that on June 19, 2013 — two days after Lloyd was murdered — he arrived at Gillette Stadium and was informed that Hernandez was in the building. Helicopters and media were already at the stadium.

    Kraft pulled Hernandez into an assistant coach's office and told him that he understood there was an "incident that transpired" and he wanted to know if Hernandez was "involved." Hernandez told him he wasn't involved, "that he was innocent, and that he was at a club."

    The Patriots owner said Hernandez hugged and kissed him on his way out of their brief meeting, which he says was something Hernandez did often.

    After Kraft finished his testimony, Patriots security specialist Mark Briggs was called to the stand. He said Hernandez know the policy that requires players to report any "potential criminal incident" to the team and the league.

    On June 19 2013, Briggs asked Hernandez if he was involved in the murder of Odin Lloyd. Hernandez told him he was not involved, that he was innocent, and that he "swore on his baby's life that he was telling the truth." Briggs later asked Hernandez to leave the Patriots facility because his presence was "bad for business."

    Prosecution is expected to rest its case later this week, and Patriots coach Bill Belichick is on the witness list and could be called to the stand.

    LINK: Aaron Hernandez’s Fianceé Testifies About Box That Allegedly Contained Murder Weapon

    LINK: A Bullet Casing Covered In Bubblicious Is An Important Piece Of Evidence In The Aaron Hernandez Trial


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  • 04/02/15--10:01: The Freshwater Fish Quiz
  • No bait on this click: just a good ol’ fishing quiz.


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    The nature of the relationship between the former New England Patriots star, charged with first-degree murder, and the victim has played a central role in the two-month trial.

    Were Aaron Hernandez and Odin Lloyd close friends? Or were they just two men who knew each other because their girlfriends were sisters?

    Were Aaron Hernandez and Odin Lloyd close friends? Or were they just two men who knew each other because their girlfriends were sisters?

    Steven Senne / AP

    Prosecutors have built a strong case, though circumstantial, against Hernandez. The evidence at the heart of the state's case includes a shoe print, a bullet casing, and his fiancée's testimony about throwing away a large box.

    The murder weapon, a .45 Glock, was never recovered. Instead, prosecutors relied on a Glock employee's testimony that a black object Hernandez was holding the day of Lloyd's murder could conceivably be the same weapon.

    The prosecution has struggled to establish a motive. Because they are making a case for first degree murder, they are not required to present a motive, though it would greatly help their case. And under Massachusetts law, prosecutors do not need to prove Hernandez pulled the trigger — just that he orchestrated the killing.

    Because Hernandez was with two other friends the night of Lloyd's murder, both defense attorneys and prosecutors have attempted to portray the two as friends.

    Defense lawyers want the jury to believe a man wouldn't kill a close friend.

    The prosecution wants the jury to believe that Hernandez was the only person with a close enough relationship with Lloyd — and who was around him at the time of his death — to be driven to murder. (Hernandez was with Lloyd before he was killed, but his defense has said he was with two friends, Ernest Wallace and Carlos Ortiz, when the actual murder occurred.)

    But while lawyers for both sides want the jury to believe they were buddies, the evidence presented at the trial — through exhibits and witnesses — is conflicted on the question.

    If the jury doesn't believe Hernandez and Lloyd were close, it largely removes emotion — and the motives or lack thereof that come from that — from their deliberations. Instead, the jury will have to ask if the prosecution's circumstantial evidence shows, beyond a reasonable doubt, that Hernandez did it. The defense, on Thursday, filed a motion to dismiss, arguing that "no rational jury could find every essential element of the crimes charged beyond reasonable doubt."


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    Sometimes your multimillionaire dad knows best.

    You probably know Deion Sanders as a two-time Super Bowl champion cornerback, NFL Hall of Famer, and MLB outfielder.

    You probably know Deion Sanders as a two-time Super Bowl champion cornerback, NFL Hall of Famer, and MLB outfielder.

    Elsa / Getty Images


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    Frazer Harrison / Getty Images

    Twenty years after he left Major League Baseball and 14 years after coming out as gay, Billy Bean was recently back in a uniform, working out with the Mets in Port St. Lucie, Florida.

    Bean (not to be confused with Billy Beane of Moneyball fame), MLB’s newly installed “inclusion ambassador,” had been on a five-week spring training tour, meeting with team executives and players as part of his new mission: Change the culture of baseball.

    The day with the Mets showed the promise and the challenge of this new job. He showered and suited up in the Mets clubhouse, stretched and warmed up with the team, threw batting practice and played catch with the outfielders, and was able to talk to players about his own experience as a closeted gay man in professional sports.

    But following the visit, Mets second baseman Daniel Murphy told a reporter he “disagreed with the fact that Billy is a homosexual.” Murphy, who says he is a devout Christian, said that he did think he could accept an openly gay player on his team, however. “We love the people. We disagree with the lifestyle.”

    Media and fans were quick to criticize Murphy’s comments.

    In a post on MLB.com, Bean wrote he “appreciated that Daniel spoke his truth.”

    “He was brave to share his feelings, and it made me want to work harder and be a better example that someday might allow him to view things from my perspective, if only for just a moment,” Bean continued on his blog. “The silver lining in his comments are that he would be open to investing in a relationship with a teammate, even if he ‘disagrees’ with the lifestyle. It may not be perfect, but I do see him making an effort to reconcile his religious beliefs with his interpretation of the word lifestyle.”

    During a recent interview with BuzzFeed News, Bean said he “didn't want to appear soft," in his response to Murphy, but that his main intent is to “encourage Murphy to take a step closer to seeing life from my perspective, just as I'm trying to see life from his."

    As a former baseball player and an out gay man, Bean is part of two rarely overlapping communities. He said he absolutely has a “fire in his belly” for LGBT issues, but knows that if he is not patient, he will fail at his job. There will be more Daniel Murphy incidents to handle in his new role.

    In 2013, Billy Bean was living in Los Angeles and working in real estate when he received a call from Paul Mifsud, a labor relations attorney at MLB.

    Earlier that year, the New York attorney general’s office requested a meeting with all New York–based sports leagues to discuss their handling of LGBT inclusion. After that meeting, MLB decided it was time to make “meaningful steps” toward improving its inclusion of LGBT players and employees, and began reaching out to prominent members of the LGBT community. After reading Bean’s memoir, Going the Other Way, Mifsud decided he wanted to welcome Bean back into the baseball family. The two men had never spoken, and during the initial phone call, Mifsud told Bean he knew this phone call was “12 to 13 years late,” but hoped Bean might consider visiting MLB headquarters in New York to “give his opinions on some things.”

    By the end of the next week, Bean was standing in the commissioner’s office and recounting his personal journey as a closeted baseball player. A few days after he returned to Los Angeles, he received another call from Mifsud: “Would you consider working with us?” And without much of a plan or many details, he did.

    Bean recognizes the significance of his new role: “I was brought back to baseball for the same reason I left. Not a lot of people get that opportunity.”

    Bean played professional baseball from 1987 to 1995, all the while keeping a secret. A Southern California native, Bean was drafted by the Detroit Tigers in 1986, when he was 22. He played two seasons with the Tigers, another with the Dodgers, then finished his career with the Padres after a year playing in Japan.

    When he left the sport, he was grieving the loss of his partner to HIV-related illness and worried that he might receive a positive diagnosis as well. Bean didn’t have familial or social systems of support, and he certainly wasn’t going to come out to his teammates.

    For years, Bean had hoped that not acting on his desires would mean he was not gay. In 1989, Bean married his now ex-wife Gina, whom he still speaks of with love and affection. But three years later, Bean met Sam, who would later become his partner.

    Neither of the men were out to their families (which is why Bean does not want to use Sam’s last name), and Bean began to feel the pressure of balancing the man he was to baseball and to his family, and who he was to the man he loved.

    In an MLB Network documentary on Bean’s life in baseball, he reveals one of his biggest regrets as being the lengths he went to conceal his relationship with Sam. Out of fear that his team might begin to suspect he was gay, Bean did not invite Sam to watch his games. Bean realized the unfairness of his actions in 1993, when he hit his first career home run without Sam in the stands and later celebrated with his teammates instead. Later that season, Bean got Sam a seat in the family section — “if anyone asks, tell them you’re my buddy from out of town.” During that game, Bean blasted another home run, and when he rounded third, he looked up to find Sam in the family section.

    In 1995, Sam was diagnosed with HIV, but Bean’s test came back negative. A doctor, who Bean told BuzzFeed News did not have any expert understanding of HIV, told Bean he was likely to contract it as well. He was tested every other month, but his tests always came back negative.

    Two months after Sam’s diagnosis, Bean came home and found him unconscious on the floor. He took Sam to a hospital, where he later died of cardiac arrest. In his MLB Network special, Bean said the fear of being recognized at a hospital closer to his home led him to take Sam to a hospital a half hour from their home.

    Bean considers that decision to drive to a further hospital: “Could it have been different?”

    AP

    After five weeks of traveling between Arizona and Florida, during a lunch with BuzzFeed News Bean was tan and armed with information he said will help him in his new role. He also joked that he is ready to throw his suitcase into the biggest dumpster he can find.

    Baseball season is about to begin. He expects to be with the Dodgers on opening day April 5, and then will move from Los Angeles to New York, where the league headquarters is located near Grand Central Station.

    During the spring training circuit, Bean met only with teams that invited him — the Tigers, Mets, Yankees, Phillies, Cardinals, Red Sox, and Astros, Reds, Rockies, Cubs, Giants, Rangers, Angels, A’s, Padres, and Indians. He also visited league administrators and coaches with MLB’s Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities program.

    Some teams invited him to speak to their minor league rosters, and a few asked him to talk to their major league players. For teams with more conservative front offices, Bean knows that getting an invite will take some time.

    Bean told BuzzFeed News that feels protective of the players he speaks to and a giant responsibility to them. He feels a need to show these men a “consistent, relatable image” of one gay man, and believes it’s possible that for many of the players, this is the first conversation they’ve knowingly had with an LGBT person.

    Bean recalled that during his visit to the Cleveland Indians’ spring training camp in Goodyear, Arizona, first baseman Nick Swisher approached him and said, “I think you’re effing brave.”

    Bean noticed Swisher was engaged during his speech and was looking around to make sure his teammates were paying attention. His active participation excited Bean: “If speaking to a club leads to two to three guys seeing things from my perspective, then it was worth it.”

    While some have wondered whether the unspoken goal of Bean’s job is to coax players out of the closet, Bean told BuzzFeed News that he is looking to institute a league-wide culture of acceptance rather than immediately introducing an out player. MLB is a global operation with thousands of corporate employees and Bean's message is that anyone who is qualified will be welcomed by baseball. Bean told BuzzFeed News that his initiative might “incidentally” lead to a player deciding to come out on his own, but that MLB is by no means looking for “receipts” of their effort.

    “I’m doing it for those who can’t talk,” he said.

    This strategy is in essence the inverse of how the league handled integration of black players. When Brooklyn Dodgers president and general manager Branch Rickey began the process of bringing Jackie Robinson to MLB, he told Robinson he must stay silent and not engage the players, fans, and MLB employees who would yell slurs, play dirty, and do anything to keep baseball white. The burden of baseball’s culture of ignorance was left on Robinson’s shoulders. Though he and Rickey — whose signing of Robinson was as much of a business and baseball decision as it was for social good — managed to poke holes in baseball’s color barrier, full support from the league and integration from every team took more than a decade. Bean points out that 12 years passed between Jackie Robinson’s major league debut and the Red Sox’s (forced) integration.

    Under Bean’s guidance, the message of support and inclusion will come from the top down.

    MLB’s transformation into a more LGBT-inclusive workplace will be a slow process and Bean’s spring training junket was just the beginning of his involvement with teams. Mifsud, who orchestrated Bean’s return to baseball, knows the league got “very lucky” with Bean as a leader, and his impact on the league has already been felt in the commissioner’s office. “People tell me they’ve never been prouder to work for baseball,” Mifsud told BuzzFeed News. “A few members of our team have even come out to me personally.”

    Bean and the ballplayers he speaks to have a common passion for baseball, and they understand the unique stress of reaching and staying in the majors. He hopes this can be the first, and most important, brick in the bridge he aims to build between the baseball and LGBT communities. During his meetings with players, Bean said he regularly asks players to consider how they influence the kids who see them as heroes. To Bean, it's simple: “Are we raising bullies, or are we raising leaders?”


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    This is America. And you’ve earned the right to eat deep fried Nutella.

    The Down Wisconsin Avenue Brat — Milwaukee Brewers, Miller Park

    The Down Wisconsin Avenue Brat — Milwaukee Brewers, Miller Park

    This is a foot-and-half-long brat, and somewhere under there are cheese curds and shoestring fries and fried sauerkraut, and YES, YES TO ALL OF THIS.

    Delaware North

    Pork Rinds With Queso Dip — Detroit Tigers, Comerica Park

    Pork Rinds With Queso Dip — Detroit Tigers, Comerica Park

    It's the mix of salty pork and liquid cheese we've all been waiting for. That sound you hear is every Buffalo Wild Wings executive asking themselves, "How the hell did we not think of this yet?"

    Sportservice / Via crainsdetroit.com


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    The player directed the slur at Wisconsin’s Frank Kaminsky after the team’s loss.

    University of Kentucky basketball player Andrew Harrison apologized Sunday for dropping a racial slur at a press conference after his team lost to Wisconsin in the Final Four in Indianapolis on Saturday night.

    At the press conference, Harrison is heard muttering the phrase into his microphone after his teammate was asked about playing against Kaminsky.

    Kentucky Wildcats guard Andrew Harrison is defended by Wisconsin Badgers forward Nigel Hayes (10) and forward Frank Kaminsky (44).

    Usa Today Sports / USA Today Sports


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    Most of the arrests were for public intoxication and disorderly conduct.

    Thirty-one people were arrested in Lexington, Kentucky, on Saturday night after the Kentucky Wildcats lost to the Wisconsin Badgers in the NCAA Final Four in Indianapolis.

    Thirty-one people were arrested in Lexington, Kentucky, on Saturday night after the Kentucky Wildcats lost to the Wisconsin Badgers in the NCAA Final Four in Indianapolis.

    David Stephenson / AP

    The department deployed police officers in riot gear after the Wildcats were defeated 71-64.

    Approximately 1,500 people swarmed the streets near the University of Kentucky campus after the game.

    The officers mostly just kept an eye on the crowd, but did use pepper balls to break up a fight, Roberts said.

    "(Police are) thankful no one was seriously injured and that there was no major destruction of property," she told the AP.

    "(Police are) thankful no one was seriously injured and that there was no major destruction of property," she told the AP.

    David Stephenson / AP

    Many fans took the opportunity to take selfies with the police officers who were decked out in their tactical gear.

    instagram.com


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    Perhaps a peeasco? WARNING: This story contains photo of pee cups.

    On Sunday night Cubs fans descended on the iconic Wrigley Field for the team's home opener.

    instagram.com

    About 35,000 baseball devotees turned out to watch the Cardinals take down the Cubs in a 3–0 loss.

    instagram.com

    It was a celebration of America's favorite pastime.

    instagram.com


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    Tonight we put an end to the Madness. Follow along here and at BuzzFeed Sports for live updates.


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    In an interview with New York, Rice said he has learned in the last year to put his family first.

    Ray Rice described in a new interview with New York magazine how his relationship with his wife, Janay, has changed since he punched her in the face in a New Jersey casino elevator on Valentine's Day in 2014.

    Ray Rice described in a new interview with New York magazine how his relationship with his wife, Janay, has changed since he punched her in the face in a New Jersey casino elevator on Valentine's Day in 2014.

    Christopher Anderson / New York Magazine

    Rice and Janay have given interviews since the incident, which was caught on surveillance camera and released to the public. The New York article, though, adds dimension and context to to their relationship and the tension between them leading up to the incident.

    Rice is portrayed as the man who cared more about football than Janay and their daughter, Rayven. Janay discussed how that, and the the pressure of raising their child and being the wife of a celebrity weighed on her:

    "I felt I was doing everything by myself," Janay said. "After a while, I resented that. I felt like a walking zombie. I told Ray he needed to change more diapers." Instead, Rice found excuses to stay away. He overbooked charity events—often three back-to-back on his one day off each week.

    After the punch and TMZ.com's release of the video – which showed Rice dragging Janay's unconscious body out of the elevator – the NFL suspended him for two games and the Ravens held a press conference in which Janay apologized for her involvement in the attack on her. Rumors of Janay initiating the argument have kept Ray a sympathetic figure in the minds of many fans.

    The feature implied that Janay provoked the argument because she was fed up with her neglectful fiancé who was an uninvolved father of her child.

    On that Valentine's Day, Janay wanted a couple's night. Rice instead rounded up a handful of friends, got drunk, and paid attention to his phone instead of Janay, according to the magazine. She became confrontational. He walked away, remained on his phone, and she snapped amid the tension.

    She walked by, turned, took a step toward him, and slapped his face. "We were drunk and tired," Janay said later. Rice followed her slowly to the elevator.

    The magazine said Rice never recovered from childhood trauma – namely his father's murder – and as an adolescent he turned to football. He felt it was all he had, and he made it his number one priority. Ray says he never learned emotional coping mechanisms. His therapist says he "gave him probably three sessions to cry. And then, after that, no more crying."

    Patrick Semansky / AP


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    In their closing arguments Tuesday, the former New England Patriots star’s defense lawyers leaned heavily on gaps in the prosecution’s case. Hernandez is on trial for first-degree murder.

    One of the significant pieces of evidence prosecutors introduced against former NFL star Aaron Hernandez, on trial for the death of Odin Lloyd, is surveillance footage from his home taken hours after the homicide. It shows something in Hernandez's hand:

    One of the significant pieces of evidence prosecutors introduced against former NFL star Aaron Hernandez, on trial for the death of Odin Lloyd, is surveillance footage from his home taken hours after the homicide. It shows something in Hernandez's hand:

    Dominick Reuter / AP

    "You saw Hernandez carrying an item after the murder. Determine for yourself if it is an iPad or a gun," he said Tuesday during his 90-minute summation.

    Sultan also told the jury about the concept of confirmation bias, calling it a "fancy phrase" for the common phenomenon of searching for evidence to support a preexisting theory.

    After showing the video of Hernandez carrying the gunlike object out of his basement, Sultan showed another video of Hernandez emerging from the basement later that night.

    In this second video, he was holding another bulky, black object. One appeared to look more like an iPad than a Glock. Hernandez's mother, Terri, who was sitting in the family row behind her son, nodded and whispered "iPad" when the video was shown.

    In March, Glock employee Kyle Aspinwall testified that the black object appeared consistent with the appearance of a .45 Glock — the same type of weapon used on Odin Lloyd, according to shell casings left at the scene. The murder weapon was never found, and prosecutors continue to allege Hernandez's fiancée threw it out at Hernandez's request.

    However, some of Aspinwall's testimony was struck from the record, according to the Associated Press. Jurors can consider his identification of the gun based on what appeared to be a back strap, but they could not consider his testimony about the possible trigger guard or front strap.

    The jury is currently deliberating.


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    U-rah-rah Wisconsin! Praise to thee we sing!

    Because the Badgers were already champions before the tournament started.

    Because the Badgers were already champions before the tournament started.

    A regular season school record for wins. Big Ten champions. Big Ten Tournament Champions. It was already one of the greatest seasons in UW history.

    Jonathan Daniel / Getty Images

    Because Wisconsin entered the tournament as a No. 1 seed for the first time ever.

    Because Wisconsin entered the tournament as a No. 1 seed for the first time ever.

    And by the end of the tournament, Wisconsin had definitely proven that they deserved it.

    Sports Illustrated

    Because this is how Wisconsin center Frank Kaminsky celebrated that No. 1 seed.

    Because this is how Wisconsin center Frank Kaminsky celebrated that No. 1 seed.

    Note the eye contact. It really brings a whole new level to the ball-rubbing.

    BuzzFeed

    Because only one win into the tournament, sophomore forward Nigel Hayes noticed the press stenographer. And then he tested her spelling.

    Because only one win into the tournament, sophomore forward Nigel Hayes noticed the press stenographer. And then he tested her spelling.

    "Well, the wonderful young lady over there, I think her job title is a stenographer, yes, OK. And she does an amazing job of typing words, sometimes if words are not in her dictionary, maybe if I say soliloquy right now, she may have to work a little bit harder to type that word, or quandary, zephyr, xylophone, things like that, that make her job really interesting."

    Charlie Neibergall / AP


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    Oh, and: She’s been in the officiating biz for nearly twenty years.

    The NFL announced its list of regular season referees for the 2015 season, which includes Sarah Thomas, a longtime college football official.

    The NFL announced its list of regular season referees for the 2015 season, which includes Sarah Thomas, a longtime college football official.

    Jonathan Bachman / AP

    Thomas told ABC News that she decided pursue officiating when she realized she wanted to know more about the game.

    Thomas officiated her first high school football game in 1999 after a series of tests and training with football leagues for kids.

    Thomas officiated her first high school football game in 1999 after a series of tests and training with football leagues for kids.

    Duane Burleson / AP


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